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dc.contributor.editorEklöv, Peter
dc.creatorPapacostas, Katherine
dc.creatorFreestone, Amy L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-20T16:23:03Z
dc.date.available2020-04-20T16:23:03Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-06
dc.identifier.citationPapacostas KJ, Freestone AL (2019) Multi-trophic native and non-native prey naïveté shape marine invasion success. PLoS ONE 14(9): e0221969. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0221969
dc.identifier.issn1664-2295
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/43
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/56
dc.description.abstractInvasive predators have caused rapid declines in many native prey species across the globe. Predator invasion success may be attributed to prey naïvete´, or the absence of antipredator behavior between native and non-native species. An understanding of the effects of naïvete´ at different timescales since introduction and across multiple trophic levels is lacking, however, particularly in marine systems. Given the central role of trophic interactions in invasion dynamics, this knowledge gap limits the ability to predict high impact predator invasions. Naïvete´ was examined across three trophic levels of marine invertebrates: a native basal prey (hard clam), two non-native intermediate predators (the recently-introduced Asian shore crab and the long-established European green crab), a native intermediate predator (juvenile blue crabs), and a native top predator (adult blue crab). We hypothesized that naïvete´ would be more pronounced in trophic interactions involving the recently-introduced non-native predator in comparison to the long-established non-native and native intermediate predators. We further hypothesized that the recently-introduced intermediate predator would both benefit from naïvete´ of the native basal prey and be hindered by higher mortality through its own naïvete´ to the native top predator. To test these hypotheses, three laboratory experiments and a field experiment were used. Consistent with our hypotheses, basal prey naïvete´ was most pronounced with the recently-introduced intermediate predator, and this increased the predator’s foraging success. This recently-introduced intermediate predator, however, exhibited an ineffective anti-predator response to the native top predator, and was also preyed upon more in the field than its long-established and native counterparts. Therefore, despite direct benefits from basal prey naïvete´, the recently-introduced intermediate predator’s naïvete´ to its own predators may limit its invasion success. These results highlight the importance of a multi-trophic perspective on predator-prey dynamics to more fully understand the consequences of naïvete´ in invasion biology.
dc.format.extent14 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofOpen Access Publishing Fund (OAPF)
dc.relation.haspartPLOS One, Vol. 14, No. 9
dc.relation.isreferencedbyPLOS
dc.relation.isreferencedbyPapacostas, Katherine J.; Freestone, Amy L. (2019): Multi-trophic native and non-native prey naïveté shape marine invasion success. PLOS ONE. Dataset. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0221969
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectPredation
dc.subjectCrabs
dc.subjectForaging
dc.subjectInvasive species
dc.subjectBivalves
dc.subjectBurrowing
dc.subjectPredator-prey dynamics
dc.subjectMarine environments
dc.titleMulti-trophic native and non-native prey naïveté shape marine invasion success
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreArticle (Other)
dc.description.departmentBiology
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0221969
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Science and Technology
dc.description.sponsorTemple University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund, 2019-2020 (Philadelphia, Pa.)
dc.creator.orcid0000-0002-2937-4968
dc.temple.creatorPapacostas, Katherine J.
dc.temple.creatorFreestone, Amy L.
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-20T16:23:03Z


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