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dc.creatorDiSantis, KI
dc.creatorCollins, BN
dc.creatorFisher, JO
dc.creatorDavey, A
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-31T23:31:05Z
dc.date.available2021-01-31T23:31:05Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-17
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/5489
dc.identifier.other21849028 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/5507
dc.description.abstractBackground: Behavioral mechanisms that contribute to the association between breastfeeding and reduced obesity risk are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that feeding human milk from the breast (direct breastfeeding) has a more optimal association with subsequent child appetite regulation behaviors and growth, when compared to bottle-feeding.Methods: Children (n = 109) aged 3- to 6- years were retrospectively classified as directly breastfed (fed exclusively at the breast), bottle-fed human milk, or bottle-fed formula in the first three months of life. Young children's appetite regulation was examined by measuring three constructs (satiety response, food responsiveness, enjoyment of food) associated with obesity risk, using the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to test whether children bottle-fed either human milk or formula had reduced odds of high satiety and increased odds of high food responsiveness and high enjoyment of food compared to children fed directly from the breast. Current child weight status and growth trends from 6-36 months were also examined for their relation to direct breastfeeding and appetite regulation behaviors in early childhood.Results: Children fed human milk in a bottle were 67% less likely to have high satiety responsiveness compared to directly breastfed children, after controlling for child age, child weight status, maternal race/ethnicity, and maternal education. There was no association of bottle-feeding (either human milk or formula) with young children's food responsiveness and enjoyment of food. There was neither an association of direct breastfeeding with current child weight status, nor was there a clear difference between directly breastfed and bottle-fed children in growth trajectories from 6- to 36-months. More rapid infant changes in weight-for-age score were associated with lower satiety responsiveness, higher food responsiveness and higher enjoyment of food in later childhood. Conclusion: While direct breastfeeding was not found to differentially affect growth trajectories from infancy to childhood compared to bottle-feeding, results suggest direct breastfeeding during early infancy is associated with greater appetite regulation later in childhood. A better understanding of such behavioral distinctions between direct breastfeeding and bottle-feeding may identify new pathways to reduce the pediatric obesity epidemic. © 2011 DiSantis et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
dc.format.extent89-89
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.haspartInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
dc.relation.isreferencedbySpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsCC BY
dc.subjectbottle-feeding
dc.subjectdirect breastfeeding
dc.subjectsatiety
dc.subjectobesity
dc.subjectchild eating behaviors
dc.titleDo infants fed directly from the breast have improved appetite regulation and slower growth during early childhood compared with infants fed from a bottle?
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.genreJournal Article
dc.relation.doi10.1186/1479-5868-8-89
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.date.updated2021-01-31T23:31:02Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-31T23:31:05Z


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