Show simple item record

dc.creatorPacheco, MA
dc.creatorReid, MJC
dc.creatorSchillaci, MA
dc.creatorLowenberger, CA
dc.creatorGaldikas, BMF
dc.creatorJones-Engel, L
dc.creatorEscalante, AA
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-31T22:22:52Z
dc.date.available2021-01-31T22:22:52Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-20
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/5447
dc.identifier.other22536346 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/5465
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recent findings of Plasmodium in African apes have changed our perspectives on the evolution of malarial parasites in hominids. However, phylogenetic analyses of primate malarias are still missing information from Southeast Asian apes. In this study, we report molecular data for a malaria parasite lineage found in orangutans. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened twenty-four blood samples from Pongo pygmaeus (Kalimantan, Indonesia) for Plasmodium parasites by PCR. For all the malaria positive orangutan samples, parasite mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) and two antigens: merozoite surface protein 1 42 kDa (MSP-1 42) and circumsporozoite protein gene (CSP) were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Fifteen orangutans tested positive and yielded 5 distinct mitochondrial haplotypes not previously found. The haplotypes detected exhibited low genetic divergence among them, indicating that they belong to one species. We report phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial genomes, MSP-1 42 and CSP. We found that the orangutan malaria parasite lineage was part of a monophyletic group that includes all the known non-human primate malaria parasites found in Southeast Asia; specifically, it shares a recent common ancestor with P. inui (a macaque parasite) and P. hylobati (a gibbon parasite) suggesting that this lineage originated as a result of a host switch. The genetic diversity of MSP-1 42 in orangutans seems to be under negative selection. This result is similar to previous findings in non-human primate malarias closely related to P. vivax. As has been previously observed in the other Plasmodium species found in non-human primates, the CSP shows high polymorphism in the number of repeats. However, it has clearly distinctive motifs from those previously found in other malarial parasites. Conclusion: The evidence available from Asian apes indicates that these parasites originated independently from those found in Africa, likely as the result of host switches from other non-human primates. © 2012 Pacheco et al.
dc.format.extente34990-e34990
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.haspartPLoS ONE
dc.relation.isreferencedbyPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.rightsCC BY
dc.subjectAmino Acid Sequence
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectApe Diseases
dc.subjectBayes Theorem
dc.subjectGenetic Speciation
dc.subjectGenome, Mitochondrial
dc.subjectHaplotypes
dc.subjectLikelihood Functions
dc.subjectMalaria
dc.subjectMerozoite Surface Protein 1
dc.subjectModels, Genetic
dc.subjectMolecular Sequence Data
dc.subjectMultilocus Sequence Typing
dc.subjectPhylogeny
dc.subjectPlasmodium
dc.subjectPolymorphism, Genetic
dc.subjectPongo
dc.subjectProtozoan Proteins
dc.subjectSequence Analysis, DNA
dc.subjectTandem Repeat Sequences
dc.titleThe origin of malarial parasites in orangutans
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.genreJournal Article
dc.relation.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0034990
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.date.updated2021-01-31T22:22:49Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-31T22:22:52Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
The origin of malarial parasites ...
Size:
625.8Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record