Show simple item record

dc.creatorO'Kelly, Julian Winn
dc.creatorJames, L.
dc.creatorPalaniappan, R.
dc.creatorTaborin, J.
dc.creatorFachner, Jörg
dc.creatorMagee, Wendy L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-31T20:41:40Z
dc.date.available2021-01-31T20:41:40Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-25
dc.identifier.citationO’Kelly J, James L, Palaniappan R, Taborin J, Fachner J and Magee WL. (2013). Neurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious states. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 7:884. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00884
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/5404
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/5422
dc.description.abstractAssessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population. Debate surrounds whether behavioral assessments provide greatest accuracy in diagnosis compared to neuro-imaging methods, and despite developments in both, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects of musical stimuli on arousal, attention, and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits. However, an evidence base is lacking as to which procedures are most effective. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioral study was undertaken comparing electroencephalogram (EEG), heart rate variability, respiration, and behavioral responses of 20 healthy subjects with 21 individuals in vegetative or minimally conscious states (VS or MCS). Subjects were presented with live preferred music and improvised music entrained to respiration (procedures typically used in music therapy), recordings of disliked music, white noise, and silence. ANOVA tests indicated a range of significant responses (p ≤ 0.05) across healthy subjects corresponding to arousal and attention in response to preferred music including concurrent increases in respiration rate with globally enhanced EEG power spectra responses (p = 0.05–0.0001) across frequency bandwidths. Whilst physiological responses were heterogeneous across patient cohorts, significant post hoc EEG amplitude increases for stimuli associated with preferred music were found for frontal midline theta in six VS and four MCS subjects, and frontal alpha in three VS and four MCS subjects (p = 0.05–0.0001). Furthermore, behavioral data showed a significantly increased blink rate for preferred music (p = 0.029) within the VS cohort. Two VS cases are presented with concurrent changes (p ≤ 0.05) across measures indicative of discriminatory responses to both music therapy procedures. A third MCS case study is presented highlighting how more sensitive selective attention may distinguish MCS from VS. The findings suggest that further investigation is warranted to explore the use of music therapy for prognostic indicators, and its potential to support neuroplasticity in rehabilitation programs.
dc.format.extent15 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty/ Researcher Works
dc.relation.haspartFrontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 7
dc.relation.isreferencedbyFrontiers Media SA
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectEEG
dc.subjectMusic therapy
dc.subjectDisorders of consciousness
dc.subjectAssessment
dc.subjectDiagnosis
dc.subjectBrain injury
dc.subjectVegetative state
dc.subjectMinimally conscious state
dc.titleNeurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious states
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreJournal article
dc.description.departmentMusic Therapy
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00884
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeBoyer College of Music and Dance
dc.creator.orcidMagee|0000-0003-4350-1289
dc.temple.creatorMagee, Wendy L.
dc.date.updated2021-01-31T20:41:36Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-31T20:41:40Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Neurophysiological and behavioral ...
Size:
2.021Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution CC BY
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution CC BY