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dc.contributor.advisorJordan, Will J.
dc.creatorAke-Little, Ethan Stacey
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-16T13:24:35Z
dc.date.available2020-10-16T13:24:35Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/525
dc.description.abstractTeacher turnover is a well-studied phenomenon, particularly in highly urbanized locales, but not well researched in a state as geographically and demographically diverse as Pennsylvania, which is a composition of two major metropolitan areas combined with smaller urban centers and expansive rural regions. Those retention studies that do exist have been mainly exclusive to the Philadelphia region, with limited research devoted to the remainder of the state. This lack of a comprehensive empirical approach that compares turnover in three distinct settings limits a nuanced understanding of the issue and, in turn, can lead to incomplete policy considerations. This study utilizes Pennsylvania Department of Education data from 2012-2017, which describes the entire public-school workforce in all local education agencies (LEAs), to study how compensation and auxiliary spending (per student spending sans instructional costs) influence teacher turnover using multiple, parallel Cox Proportional Hazards survival models. Findings suggest that despite a “one size fits all” approach to public school funding policy popular amongst politicians on both sides of the political aisle, the effects of a monetary increase in reducing the likelihood of turnover varies considerably when accounting for the region, Title I status, experience and subject matter. The study highlights how the lack of monetary investment can lead teachers to seek employment elsewhere since low pay functions as a strong demotivator. Additionally, the results suggest that while a pay raise may arrest turnover risk, it is a poor long-term motivator or cause of job satisfaction. The study concludes by offering state and LEA leaders with policy recommendations that may improve both retention and job satisfaction. To date, this is the only study in the current literature that explores teacher turnover extensively in the nation’s fifth most populous state.
dc.format.extent291 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation Policy
dc.subjectEducational Leadership
dc.subjectOrganizational Behavior
dc.subjectEducational Leadership
dc.subjectEducation Politics and Finance
dc.subjectPopulation Data
dc.subjectState Education Policy
dc.subjectSurvival Analysis
dc.subjectTeacher Retention
dc.titleTo Leave or Not to Leave: A Population Study Investigating How Compensation and Auxiliary Spending Influence Teacher Turnover in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberMcGinley, Christopher W.
dc.contributor.committeememberKlugman, Joshua
dc.contributor.committeememberWebber, Douglas (Douglas A.)
dc.description.departmentUrban Education
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/507
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-16T13:24:35Z
dc.embargo.lift05/17/2021


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