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dc.creatorHawley, NL
dc.creatorJohnson, W
dc.creatorHart, CN
dc.creatorTriche, EW
dc.creatorAh Ching, J
dc.creatorMuasau-Howard, B
dc.creatorMcGarvey, ST
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-29T22:03:37Z
dc.date.available2021-01-29T22:03:37Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-03
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/5222
dc.identifier.other25643752 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/5240
dc.description.abstract© Hawley et al. Background: As obesity has increased worldwide, so have levels of obesity during pregnancy and excess gestational weight gain (GWG). The aim of this paper was to describe GWG among American Samoan women and examine the association between GWG and four adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes: cesarean delivery, small- and large-for-gestational age (SGA/LGA), and infant overweight/obesity. Methods: Data were extracted from prenatal care records of 632 Samoan women. Mixed-effects growth models were used to produce individual weight-for-gestational week curves from which second and third trimester weight gain was estimated. Binary logistic regression was used to examine associations between GWG and the outcomes of interest. Results: Most women were overweight/obese in early pregnancy (86%) and 78% exceeded the Institute of Medicine GWG guidelines. Greater GWG in the second trimester and early pregnancy weight were independently associated with increased odds of a c-section (OR 1.40 [95% CI: 1.08, 1.83]) and OR 1.51 [95% CI: 1.17, 1.95], respectively). Risk of delivering a LGA infant increased with greater third trimester weight gain and higher early pregnancy weight, while second trimester weight gain was negatively associated with SGA. Risk of infant overweight/obesity at 12 months increased with early pregnancy weight (OR: 1.23 [95% CI: 1.01, 1.51]) and infant birthweight. Conclusions: The high levels of pregnancy obesity and excessive GWG in American Samoa suggest that it is important for physicians to encourage women into prenatal care early and begin education about appropriate GWG and the potential risks of excess weight gain for both the mother and baby.
dc.format.extent10-
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.haspartBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
dc.relation.isreferencedbySpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.rightsCC BY
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectAmerican Samoa
dc.subjectBirth size
dc.subjectCesarean delivery
dc.subjectGestational weight gain
dc.subjectObesity
dc.titleGestational weight gain among American Samoan women and its impact on delivery and infant outcomes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.genreJournal Article
dc.relation.doi10.1186/s12884-015-0451-1
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.date.updated2021-01-29T22:03:34Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-29T22:03:37Z


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