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dc.creatorZhuo, Chuanjun
dc.creatorXue, Rong
dc.creatorLuo, Lanlan
dc.creatorJi, Feng
dc.creatorTian, Hongjun
dc.creatorQu, Hongru
dc.creatorLin, Xiaodong
dc.creatorJiang, Ronghuan
dc.creatorTao, Ran
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-22T20:52:12Z
dc.date.available2021-01-22T20:52:12Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.issn0025-7974
dc.identifier.issn1536-5964
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4871
dc.identifier.otherEW5GL (isidoc)
dc.identifier.other28562526 (pubmed)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4889
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Parkinson disease (PD) was considered as the 2nd most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease, while depression is a prevailing nonmotor symptom of PD. Typically used antidepression medication includes tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), and dopamine agonists (DA). Our study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of antidepressive medications for depression of PD. METHODS: Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched for related articles. Traditional meta-analysis and network meta-analysis (NMA) were performed with outcomes including depression score, UPDRS-II, UPDRS-III, and adverse effects. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) was also performed to illustrate the rank probabilities of different medications on various outcomes. The consistency of direct and indirect evidence was also assessed by node-splitting method. RESULTS: Results of traditional pairwise meta-analysis were performed. Concerning depression score, significant improvement was observed in AD, MAOI, SSRI, and SNRI compared with placebo. NMA was performed and more information could be obtained. DA was illustrated to be effective over placebo concerning UPDRS-III, MAOI, and SNRI. DA demonstrated a better prognosis in UPDRS-II scores compared with placebo and MAOI. However, DA and SSRI demonstrated a significant increase in adverse effects compared with placebo. The SUCRA value was calculated to evaluate the ranking probabilities of all medications on investigated outcomes, and the consistency between direct and indirect evidences was assessed by node-splitting method. CONCLUSION: SSRI had a satisfying efficacy for the depression of PD patients and could improve activities of daily living and motor function of patient but the adverse effects are unneglectable. SNRI are the safest medication with high efficacy for depression as well while other outcomes are relatively poor.
dc.format.extente6698-e6698
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.haspartMEDICINE
dc.relation.isreferencedbyOvid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
dc.rightsCC BY-NC
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.subjectadverse events
dc.subjectantidepressant
dc.subjectefficacy
dc.subjectmeta-analysis
dc.subjectParkinson disease
dc.titleEfficacy of antidepressive medication for depression in Parkinson disease: a network meta-analysis
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.genreJournal Article
dc.type.genreMeta-Analysis
dc.type.genreReview
dc.relation.doi10.1097/MD.0000000000006698
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.creator.orcidTao, Rongjia|0000-0001-5058-4401
dc.date.updated2021-01-22T20:52:08Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-22T20:52:12Z


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