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dc.contributor.advisorOrvell, Miles
dc.creatorKelly, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-18T20:21:05Z
dc.date.available2021-01-18T20:21:05Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4768
dc.description.abstractCritics of animal rights often deride the movement’s proponents for having a sentimental, juvenile misconception of what animals really are, an argument bolstered by the fact that few twenty-first-century Americans besides those engaged in the industries of animal exploitation have any prolonged contact with real animals other than their pets. Until the first decades of the twentieth century, however, American cities teemed with diverse animal residents and workers, and a rapidly increasing percentage of humans grew in their conviction that these animal neighbors should be extended considerations and rights. Shifting ideas about these animals’ roles within United States society were captured in a number of new bestselling literary genres centered around “realistic” depictions of animal characters. Because animals are often conceptualized as a “contrast class” to humanity—a fundamental “Other” by which humans establish what qualities make themselves distinct and (typically) superior—analyzing these texts and their circulation within nineteenth-century culture reveals how Americans understood authority and systems of governance, and in particular how they modeled an ideal American manhood nourished by animal bodies. What forms of exploitation and control were permissible in a man’s treatment of his animals often reflected other power dynamics within society, and so these texts also provide insight into issues of class, race, and gender. Although the historical trajectory of popular culture depictions of realistic animals shows a general increase in compassion, egalitarianism, and the extension of rights, the successful removal of much animal exploitation from visibility has allowed that exploitation to grow in spite of the increasing popular sentiment to the contrary.
dc.format.extent472 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAmerican literature
dc.subjectAmerican studies
dc.subjectAmerican history
dc.subjectAnimal studies
dc.subjectChildren's literature
dc.subjectDemocracy
dc.subjectHuman-animal relations
dc.subjectManhood and masculinity
dc.subjectPopular literature and culture
dc.titleAmerican Animals, American Men: Popular Literature from 1830 to 1915
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberSalazar, James B.
dc.contributor.committeememberFord, Talissa J.
dc.contributor.committeememberWray, Matt, 1964-
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4750
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14326
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-5985-7680
dc.date.updated2021-01-14T17:07:01Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-18T20:21:06Z
dc.identifier.filenameKelly_temple_0225E_14326.pdf


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