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dc.contributor.advisorMcGinley, Christopher W.
dc.creatorSanko, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-18T20:12:37Z
dc.date.available2021-01-18T20:12:37Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4718
dc.description.abstractThe role of the school leader is changing, as increasing regulatory obligations in the form of federal, state, and local mandates impact a principal’s ability to make autonomous decisions. Autonomy, or the ability to self-direct and make independent decisions, is a leadership aspect that fosters communal relationships; autonomy for school leaders allows them to address and be responsive to their school’s unique needs. Although public education functions within a variety of frameworks, the primary responsibility for school success lies with the school principal. No matter the level of students, or the particulars of a school’s demographics, Pennsylvania school principals are required to comply with federal, state, and local data collecting and reporting. Data-driven decisions fuel educational policymaking at the state, local, and federal levels. Today’s principals are not only charged with collecting data but also responsible for cultivating the highest performance from their students and staff. A principal’s success – the standards by which they are deemed effective by the Department of Education - is directly connected to the success of the students in their schools. Thus, there is a dynamic pull-and-tug between the need for a principal to be responsive to the school culture and community while simultaneously creating an environment of optimal performance in high-stakes testing. This research is designed to shed light on the extent to which school principals feel local, state, and federal mandates affect their autonomy and ability to provide the best experience for children. With building level data comprising half of the measure of a principal’s success, this study hopes to understand the relationship between the regulatory requirements, school success, and if principal autonomy factors into that relationship.
dc.format.extent117 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational leadership
dc.subjectEducational philosophy
dc.subjectEducational administration
dc.subjectAutonomy
dc.subjectLeadership
dc.subjectMandates
dc.subjectPrincipal
dc.subjectSuccess
dc.titleUnderstanding the Role of Principal Autonomy in School Success
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEstrada, Armando X.
dc.contributor.committeememberShorr, Lori
dc.contributor.committeememberHaviland, Joseph
dc.description.departmentEducational Administration
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4700
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14329
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-2134-9458
dc.date.updated2021-01-14T17:07:06Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-18T20:12:37Z
dc.identifier.filenameSanko_temple_0225E_14329.pdf


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