• Before and After Photography: The Makeover Method to Discipline and Punish

      Swann, Paul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • Blond or Blonde? Frank Ocean and Identity Construction

      Goldin-Perschbacher, Shana (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
    • Case Study on the use of Pedal in Bach’s Fugue no. 17 in Ab Major BVW 1

      Zohn, Steven David, 1966- (Temple University. Libraries, 2021)
      "Robert Schumann claims that “Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier should be a pianist’s bread and butter.” Whether the pianist is a young student, a teacher, or a performer, many musicians will agree with Schumann’s statement. Because so many play these pieces, there is much controversy on how to perform them, with not the least of the matters involving the use of the damper pedal or “finger pedal” on the modern piano. The damper pedal on a piano is controlled by the right foot, and finger pedaling is defined as keeping the fingers depressed in the keys for longer than written. Often, these two techniques are used in conjunction with each other to create a seamless legato and a thicker texture. Either way you decide to create legato and texture, there are two schools of thought: you should not use pedal because Bach did not include pedal indications (and it is additionally assumed these pieces were written for harpsichord, clavichord or organ), or you should use pedal and finger pedal to enhance what Bach has already written. So what do you do when you sit down to play a prelude or fugue from Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier? Do you plant your right foot firmly on the floor underneath the piano bench so as not to allow yourself to fiddle with the pedal? Do you let your instincts tell you where to add pedal? Do you look for others who have already explored this topic? The bottom line is that these decisions should ultimately be up to the performer, though it is important to note that they should always be musically informed. Recordings can give performers an idea of when to let the right foot sneak onto the pedal and when to keep the music “dry.” There are many places to use pedal in Bach’s Fugue no. 17 in Ab Major from book 1 of the WTC, thus it is highly informative to see which musicians (specifically from 1965 to 2000, as this is the date range of the recordings) decide when to use or when not use the damper pedal or finger pedaling to help the music along."
    • Celia Thaxter's Island Garden: a 19th Century Flower Garden & its Historic Restoration

      Adam, Sinclair (Temple University. Libraries, 2005)
      Celia Thaxter, perhaps the most renowned and popularly successful female poet of her time, was also a passionate and knowledgeable gardener, naturalist, and painter. In 1893, a year before her death, she wrote what today is still considered a garden literature classic, An Island Garden, in which she described what she called her "old-fashioned" small garden, roughly 15' x 50', on Appledore Island, Isles of Shoals, Maine. This book was beautifully, and famously, illustrated with paintings of her garden and home by the American impressionist Childe Hassam, and served as a popular literary chronicle of an famous American garden as well as an emrninently practical horticultural how-to guide. This small garden, lying roughly ten miles off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was renowned in its day and a mecca for the pre-eminent artists, writers, and musicians of late 19th century New England, for which it was a profound inspiration. Likewise, the recreation ofher garden, begun in 1976, continues to attract increasing throngs of visitors to this day. This paper attempts to examine, deconstruct, and evaluate Celia Thaxter's original garden-- i.e., what she grew, how she grew these plants in such a harsh North Atlantic island situation, and to discuss the garden's on-going horticultural, art-historical, and cultural significance. It is the author's proposition that Celia's island garden serves as an eminent example of the dynamic dialogue between the mediums of painting and gardening, which also succinctly and emblematically, embodies the essentially ephemeral nature of gardens as works of art and their simultaneous profound potential for affecting lasting impression and significance upon culture. Celia's island garden is further analyzed in regards to issues of gender and the Victorian 'door-yard ' garden. Finally, the garden's recreation and its popular success is critically examined and discussed in relation to the amply documented and described original garden, and its effectiveness as a historical restoration effort is evaluated.
    • Choosing Permeable Pavement Design to Maximize Stormwater Management Capabilities

      Danowsky, Joseph; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
      The goal of this project proposal is to compare current permeable pavement designs, and suggest the best design to limit pollution due to stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces. Permeable pavements are pavements with increased pore space for water to pass through. There are three considered pavement types: porous asphalt, porous concrete, and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. The specific focus is to analyze the impact of material choice on the success of the pavement. The first priority is optimizing permeability by comparing hydrological properties of each pavement design including porosity, flow rate, and hydraulic conductivity. Other parameters investigated affect feasibility of the design such as compressive strength, cost, storage capacity, and reparability. The assessment is based on the results of research studies and recommendations in construction manuals. The best pavement design utilizes porous concrete. Porous concrete has higher permeability, the main requirement for success in limiting runoff. Porous concrete also boasts reasonable cost, structural integrity, and reparability. A successful porous concrete pavement would lead to improved water quality in streams, decreased erosion of stream banks, and a decreased need for additional costly wastewater management structures. Most importantly, success would lead to long term cost benefits and public and environmental health improvements.
    • Constructing Native Homosexuality in British India

      Pollack, Mark (Temple University. Libraries, 2017)
    • Cracking Consensus: The Dominican Intervention, Public Opinion and Advocacy Organizations in the 1960s

      Goedde, Petra; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2011)
    • Cultural property repatriation: history, legality, and ethical precedents for museums in the United States

      Modigliani, Leah (Temple University. Libraries, 2016)
      Cultural property repatriation has emerged as a controversial topic of international diplomacy. Countries that were subject to archaeological desecration are now reclaiming illicitly exported artifacts from foreign museums. Because museums in the United States operate as private institutions, enforcing uniform legal standards is challenging. This paper theorizes a legislative model that would regulate the acquisition and repatriation policies of federally-funded museums. This proposal is developed through analyzing the efficacy of existing laws designed to regulate the illicit antiquities market, as well as through evaluating the federal government’s response to the repatriation movements for Native American cultural property and Holocaust-era artwork.
    • CVE: A Comparative Assessment

      Pollack, Mark (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
    • Deforestation and the spread of non-native species

      Sewall, Brent; Reuter, Kim E. (Temple University. Libraries, 2013)
      Over ninety percent of Madagascar’s original forests have been deforested, and the population of Madagascar has doubled in the past forty years, further exacerbating problems of local, unsustainable forest use. While research on Madagascar's endemic species is common, less information is known about its non-native species and the increasing effects they have on local biodiversity as the forest becomes more degraded. This study aimed to fill this gap in knowledge. We collected data on human forest use and the presence/absence of five non-native plant species: Mangifera indica, (cultivated) Albizia lebbeck (cultivated), Mucuna pruriens (non-cultivated), Lantana camara (non-cultivated), Tamarindus indica (origin unknown) in and around the periphery of the Ankarana National Park, northern Madagascar. Data was collected systematically along transects across three different forest types which ranged low to high human disturbance. We found that the presence of historically cultivated non-native species positively correlated with human disturbance. In contrast, historically non-cultivated species did not show this correlation to human disturbance levels. Our results indicate that anthropogenic modification of habitats could impacts the densities and spread of cultivated species. This study increases understanding of the negative effects that humans have on densities of non-native species in disturbed habitats, the effects of roads and human access points, and illustrates the importance of natural history knowledge of non-native species regarding their anthropogenic cultivation histories.
    • Development of the Student Sexual Health and Wellbeing Questionnaire

      Angel Adaros, Ada Esperanza (Temple University. Libraries, 2021)
      While university can be an exciting opportunity for sexual exploration, many young adults come into this experience with inadequate or inconsistent sexual health education and knowledge, and consequently experience negative sexual health outcomes. Universities can play an important role in providing resources that support students’ sexual health and wellbeing, however, this requires meaningful assessment of the students’ needs. Current measures for young adult sexual health and wellbeing are underdeveloped; often too narrow, biomedical, and outdated in their language, existing measures are not meaningful nor are they inclusive. The main objectives of this study were to (a) develop a revised, comprehensive definition of young adult sexual health and wellbeing, and (b) develop a meaningful, relevant measure for sexual health and wellbeing that could provide insight into university students’ needs. The questionnaire development process included creating an original measure for student sexual health, and a pilot study to assess the validity and reliability of the measure. The participants of the pilot study included a sample of 75 students from a small, private international university in Tokyo, Japan. Inter-item reliability analysis was used to assess the reliability for appropriate subscales, while all data was assessed for trends in participants’ experiences. The results of the inter-item reliability showed adequate to good reliability across all relevant subscales. Results showed that most students had received sexual health education during their schooling prior to entering university, and that outside of schooling the internet was, and continues to be, a primary source for sexual health information. While most students reported confidence in expressing consent, notably fewer felt confident with withdrawing consent. Regarding methods of sexual protection, students overwhelming showed comfortability with using condoms, yet were commonly unsure about using any other methods of sexual protection. Finally, while the majority of students acknowledged their sexual experiences affecting their emotional wellbeing, they much less commonly felt comfortable seeking related emotional supported when needed. Results of this study support previous research that the internet is a significant source of sexual health information, and support the benefit of utilizing a comprehensive definition for sexual health and wellbeing. They also provide key insight into directions of improvements that universities can take to provide support for their students’ sexual health. Provided the limited sample size of this study and the limited cross-cultural relevance for this measure, future research should continue include larger samples and consider adapting the measure to be specifically relevant for various cultural backgrounds.
    • Emotion and Gender in Reasoning and Decision Making

      Overton, Willis F. (Temple University. Libraries, 2005)
      This study addresses three issues: (1) whether there is a relation between reasoning and decision making performance, (2) whether general levels of positive or negative emotion predict reasoning or decision making performance, and (3) whether there are gender differences in reasoning or decision making performance. Undergraduate students were assessed with three measures: the Selection Task, the Iowa Gambling Task, and the PANAS questionnaire were used to assess reasoning, decision making, and general emotion, respectively. The results suggest that a positive relation exists between decision making and reasoning performance, that general levels of emotion predict neither reasoning performance nor decision making performance, and that there are significant gender differences in decision making performance, favoring males, but not in reasoning performance. It is concluded that similar processes appear to underlie both reasoning and decision making, that general levels of emotion do not predict reasoning or decision making performance, and that the gender difference observed for decision making performance is likely related to the way the Iowa Gambling Task is approached.
    • Ending the 'Inhuman Traffic': The Role of Humanitarianism in the British Abolition Movement

      Glasson, Travis; Biddick, Kathleen (Temple University. Libraries, 2007)
    • Explaining variations in treaty entry into force thresholds

      Bush, Sarah S. (Temple University. Libraries, 2015)
      It is widely known that treaties have different stipulations on when they come into force. Unfortunately, current research on treaty design has offered no substantial explanation on why treaties have different entry into force (EIF) thresholds. I argue that variations in EIF thresholds are the result of the issue area of the treaty. Specifically, issue areas that face greater potential for collective action problems have the highest EIF threshold as a result of the rational design choice of states to protect themselves from free riders and strengthen the effectiveness of the treaty. I test my argument using original data from coding treaty EIF thresholds along four issue areas and on the EIF negotiations for the 1996 Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.
    • Exploring the food hub network of Philadelphia

      Howe, Deborah A.; Temple University. Diamond Research Scholars (Temple University. Libraries, 2015)
    • Fenianism In Irish Catholic Philadelphia: The American Catholic Church's Battle for Acceptance

      Goedde, Petra; Varon, Elizabeth R.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • From Civil Rights to Women's Liberation: Women's Rights in SDS and SNCC, 1960-1980

      Glasson, Travis; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
    • From Classroom to Battlefield: The Role of Students in the Closing of Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1918

      Isenberg, Andrew C. (Andrew Christian); Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)