• A Crisis of Identity: Advertising & the British Ministry of Information's Propaganda Posters of World War II

      Immerman, Richard H.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
    • A Very Catty Deep Dive: Facilitating Diversity in Video Games

      Guido, Abby (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      In this project, my intent is to show as much of the foundtation for this game as possible both in effort to share my research, and share my story with other interested parties. As such, while the contents to follow are complete from my self imposed standard in August of 2018, the true nature of this project is for it to grow, change, and evolve as I work and research more. As it stands now, I have been quietly working on A Very Catty Game for the better part of six years, beginning on a whim in my freshman year of high school. It has come a long way since then, and I expect that it will go a long way from now. This piece will serve as an important resource and a mark on the calendar to see just how far I will go in the future.
    • African-American Women's Basketball in the 1920s and 1930s: Active Participants in the 'New Negro' Movement

      Collier-Thomas, Bettye; Kusmer, Kenneth L. (Temple University. Libraries, 2010)
    • Ambiguous Attacks on Democracy in Europe and the Americas: What can intergovernmental organizations do?

      Pollack, Mark; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2014)
      Past the time of traditional coups, today’s would-be dictators are seeking out more ambiguous ways to undercut democracy. These norm violations are often difficult to identify, and sometimes are conceived of as less threatening to outsiders. So, what can an intergovernmental organization do if its member states begin to violate common democratic norms in an ambiguous way? While some have claimed IGO action is determined by the violating state’s power or the pressure of third parties, few have explored the influence of an IGO’s structure and design on its decision to enforce norms. This paper explores some ambiguous measures being taken to undermine democracy, and seeks to disaggregate the complex process of IGO norm enforcement and subject the moving parts to initial scrutiny. In this paper, I assess the impact of five IGO characteristics on its decision to enforce democratic norms in member states: IGO composition or democratic density, democratic norm legalization, enforcement provisions, voting rules in the IGO’s intergovernmental branches, and delegation to the IGO’s supranational bodies. I develop six, independent hypotheses, relating one IGO characteristic to one aspect of the decision-making process. Using a pattern matching research design, I conduct a comparative case-study analysis of the Peruvian autogolpe facing the Organization of American States in 1992 and the Hungarian constitutional crisis challenging the European Union today to test each variable’s predicted effect.
    • An Examination in Social Engineering: The Susceptibility of Disclosing Private Security Information in College Students

      Rege, Aunshul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      While security technology can be nearly impenetrable, the people behind the computer screens are often easily manipulated, which makes the human factor the biggest threat to cybersecurity. This study examined whether college students disclosed private information about themselves, and what type of information they shared. The study utilized pretexting, in which attackers impersonate individuals in certain roles and often involves extensive research to ensure credibility. The goal of pretexting is to create situations where individuals feel safe releasing information that they otherwise might not. The pretexts used for this study were based on the natural inclination to help, where people tend to want to help those in need, and reciprocity, where people tend to return favors given to them. Participants (N=51) answered survey questions that they thought were for a good cause or that would result in a reward. This survey asked for increasingly sensitive information that could be used maliciously to gain access to identification, passwords, or security questions. Upon completing the survey, participants were debriefed on the true nature of the study and were interviewed about why they were willing to share information via the survey. Some of the most commonly skipped questions included “Student ID number” and “What is your mother’s maiden name?”. General themes identified from the interviews included the importance of similarities between the researcher and the subject, the researcher’s adherence to the character role, the subject’s awareness of question sensitivity, and the overall differences between online and offline disclosure. Findings suggest that college students are more likely to disclose private information if the attacker shares a similar trait with the target or if the attacker adheres to the character role they are impersonating. Additionally, this study sheds light on the research limitations, emphasizes the relevance of the human factor in security and privacy, and offers recommendations for future research.
    • As Boundaries Fade: The Social Contract in Cyberspace

      Taylor, Paul C. (Paul Christopher) (Temple University. Libraries, 2006)
      For over ten years, scholars have debated over law in cyberspace. Some, the "exceptiona!ists, " argue that cyberspace should develop its own system of laws and regulations. Others, the" unexceptionalists, " argue that real-space territorial law must govern the internet. This paper advocates a new kind of exceptionalism, grounded in an examination of legitimate authority in cyberspace. I use social contract theory to locate two sources of legitimate cyberspace authority: the authority of a real-space sovereign over its citizens and the authority of a cyberspace community formed by a distinct social contract. I argue that, because cyberspace dissolves territorial boundaries, internet users are insecure in their knowledge of political relationships and that cyberspace communities can resolve this incon venience.
    • Before and After Photography: The Makeover Method to Discipline and Punish

      Swann, Paul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • Blond or Blonde? Frank Ocean and Identity Construction

      Goldin-Perschbacher, Shana (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
    • Celia Thaxter's Island Garden: a 19th Century Flower Garden & its Historic Restoration

      Adam, Sinclair (Temple University. Libraries, 2005)
      Celia Thaxter, perhaps the most renowned and popularly successful female poet of her time, was also a passionate and knowledgeable gardener, naturalist, and painter. In 1893, a year before her death, she wrote what today is still considered a garden literature classic, An Island Garden, in which she described what she called her "old-fashioned" small garden, roughly 15' x 50', on Appledore Island, Isles of Shoals, Maine. This book was beautifully, and famously, illustrated with paintings of her garden and home by the American impressionist Childe Hassam, and served as a popular literary chronicle of an famous American garden as well as an emrninently practical horticultural how-to guide. This small garden, lying roughly ten miles off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was renowned in its day and a mecca for the pre-eminent artists, writers, and musicians of late 19th century New England, for which it was a profound inspiration. Likewise, the recreation ofher garden, begun in 1976, continues to attract increasing throngs of visitors to this day. This paper attempts to examine, deconstruct, and evaluate Celia Thaxter's original garden-- i.e., what she grew, how she grew these plants in such a harsh North Atlantic island situation, and to discuss the garden's on-going horticultural, art-historical, and cultural significance. It is the author's proposition that Celia's island garden serves as an eminent example of the dynamic dialogue between the mediums of painting and gardening, which also succinctly and emblematically, embodies the essentially ephemeral nature of gardens as works of art and their simultaneous profound potential for affecting lasting impression and significance upon culture. Celia's island garden is further analyzed in regards to issues of gender and the Victorian 'door-yard ' garden. Finally, the garden's recreation and its popular success is critically examined and discussed in relation to the amply documented and described original garden, and its effectiveness as a historical restoration effort is evaluated.
    • Choosing Permeable Pavement Design to Maximize Stormwater Management Capabilities

      Danowsky, Joseph; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
      The goal of this project proposal is to compare current permeable pavement designs, and suggest the best design to limit pollution due to stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces. Permeable pavements are pavements with increased pore space for water to pass through. There are three considered pavement types: porous asphalt, porous concrete, and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. The specific focus is to analyze the impact of material choice on the success of the pavement. The first priority is optimizing permeability by comparing hydrological properties of each pavement design including porosity, flow rate, and hydraulic conductivity. Other parameters investigated affect feasibility of the design such as compressive strength, cost, storage capacity, and reparability. The assessment is based on the results of research studies and recommendations in construction manuals. The best pavement design utilizes porous concrete. Porous concrete has higher permeability, the main requirement for success in limiting runoff. Porous concrete also boasts reasonable cost, structural integrity, and reparability. A successful porous concrete pavement would lead to improved water quality in streams, decreased erosion of stream banks, and a decreased need for additional costly wastewater management structures. Most importantly, success would lead to long term cost benefits and public and environmental health improvements.
    • Constructing Native Homosexuality in British India

      Pollack, Mark (Temple University. Libraries, 2017)
    • Cracking Consensus: The Dominican Intervention, Public Opinion and Advocacy Organizations in the 1960s

      Goedde, Petra; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2011)
    • Cultural property repatriation: history, legality, and ethical precedents for museums in the United States

      Modigliani, Leah (Temple University. Libraries, 2016)
      Cultural property repatriation has emerged as a controversial topic of international diplomacy. Countries that were subject to archaeological desecration are now reclaiming illicitly exported artifacts from foreign museums. Because museums in the United States operate as private institutions, enforcing uniform legal standards is challenging. This paper theorizes a legislative model that would regulate the acquisition and repatriation policies of federally-funded museums. This proposal is developed through analyzing the efficacy of existing laws designed to regulate the illicit antiquities market, as well as through evaluating the federal government’s response to the repatriation movements for Native American cultural property and Holocaust-era artwork.
    • CVE: A Comparative Assessment

      Pollack, Mark (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
    • Deforestation and the spread of non-native species

      Sewall, Brent; Reuter, Kim E. (Temple University. Libraries, 2013)
      Over ninety percent of Madagascar’s original forests have been deforested, and the population of Madagascar has doubled in the past forty years, further exacerbating problems of local, unsustainable forest use. While research on Madagascar's endemic species is common, less information is known about its non-native species and the increasing effects they have on local biodiversity as the forest becomes more degraded. This study aimed to fill this gap in knowledge. We collected data on human forest use and the presence/absence of five non-native plant species: Mangifera indica, (cultivated) Albizia lebbeck (cultivated), Mucuna pruriens (non-cultivated), Lantana camara (non-cultivated), Tamarindus indica (origin unknown) in and around the periphery of the Ankarana National Park, northern Madagascar. Data was collected systematically along transects across three different forest types which ranged low to high human disturbance. We found that the presence of historically cultivated non-native species positively correlated with human disturbance. In contrast, historically non-cultivated species did not show this correlation to human disturbance levels. Our results indicate that anthropogenic modification of habitats could impacts the densities and spread of cultivated species. This study increases understanding of the negative effects that humans have on densities of non-native species in disturbed habitats, the effects of roads and human access points, and illustrates the importance of natural history knowledge of non-native species regarding their anthropogenic cultivation histories.
    • Emotion and Gender in Reasoning and Decision Making

      Overton, Willis F. (Temple University. Libraries, 2005)
      This study addresses three issues: (1) whether there is a relation between reasoning and decision making performance, (2) whether general levels of positive or negative emotion predict reasoning or decision making performance, and (3) whether there are gender differences in reasoning or decision making performance. Undergraduate students were assessed with three measures: the Selection Task, the Iowa Gambling Task, and the PANAS questionnaire were used to assess reasoning, decision making, and general emotion, respectively. The results suggest that a positive relation exists between decision making and reasoning performance, that general levels of emotion predict neither reasoning performance nor decision making performance, and that there are significant gender differences in decision making performance, favoring males, but not in reasoning performance. It is concluded that similar processes appear to underlie both reasoning and decision making, that general levels of emotion do not predict reasoning or decision making performance, and that the gender difference observed for decision making performance is likely related to the way the Iowa Gambling Task is approached.
    • Ending the 'Inhuman Traffic': The Role of Humanitarianism in the British Abolition Movement

      Glasson, Travis; Biddick, Kathleen (Temple University. Libraries, 2007)