• Choosing Permeable Pavement Design to Maximize Stormwater Management Capabilities

      Danowsky, Joseph; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
      The goal of this project proposal is to compare current permeable pavement designs, and suggest the best design to limit pollution due to stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces. Permeable pavements are pavements with increased pore space for water to pass through. There are three considered pavement types: porous asphalt, porous concrete, and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. The specific focus is to analyze the impact of material choice on the success of the pavement. The first priority is optimizing permeability by comparing hydrological properties of each pavement design including porosity, flow rate, and hydraulic conductivity. Other parameters investigated affect feasibility of the design such as compressive strength, cost, storage capacity, and reparability. The assessment is based on the results of research studies and recommendations in construction manuals. The best pavement design utilizes porous concrete. Porous concrete has higher permeability, the main requirement for success in limiting runoff. Porous concrete also boasts reasonable cost, structural integrity, and reparability. A successful porous concrete pavement would lead to improved water quality in streams, decreased erosion of stream banks, and a decreased need for additional costly wastewater management structures. Most importantly, success would lead to long term cost benefits and public and environmental health improvements.