• Minimizing Cell Death During the Extrusion Bioprinting of Gelatin-Alginate Bioinks

      Danowsky, Joseph (Temple University. Libraries, 2021)
      This proposal seeks to minimize cell death while extrusion bioprinting with a gelatin-alginate bioink. Extrusion bioprinting was chosen over other types of bioprinting due to its accessibility and cost to researchers. Two different nozzles, cylindrical and conical, are examined to determine a mechanical aspect of extrusion bioprinting that can be modified to greatly minimize the cell death of bioprinted scaffolds. Gelatin-algiate bioinks can vary in concentration, and this concentration was also varied as a candidate solution to obtain the optimal concentration while maintaining a high cell survivability. The conical nozzle was chosen as the optimal printing nozzle with low shear stress, low cell damage, and highest cell viability. The 4% gelatin 5% alginate bioink was chosen as the optimal bioink concentration with optimal viscosity and high cell viability. Together, the use of this nozzle and this concentration bioink will greatly minimize the cell damage that occurs during extrusion bioprinting, boosting the quality of extrusion printing, and making it all-around more viable. Extrusion bioprinting, due to its improved cell death percentage, will be utilized more often by researchers – this will potentially accelerate the innovation of bioprinting as an overall technology towards the final goal of bioprinting a fully functioning organ.