Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMorrin, Maureen
dc.creatorYe, Ning
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T19:50:45Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T19:50:45Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4078
dc.description.abstractThis two-essay dissertation explores how sensory aspects of consumption (e.g., food packaging and food texture) influence consumer well-being. Consumers make more than 200 decisions about food every day (HealthDay 2007). Thus, it is of great importance to understand consumers’ relationships with foods (Block 2013). Essay 1 is the first research, to the best of my knowledge, to demonstrate packaging gloss biases consumers’ healthfulness perceptions and, as a result, food preference, choice, and consumption. Nine experiments, including a field experiment, show that people have learned to associate glossy surfaces on snack food packages with unhealthy products, whereas matte surfaces signal with healthier products. We further demonstrate that such associations are due to sensation transference triggered by packaging gloss and are especially true for restrained eaters, who are more sensitive to food healthfulness cues (e.g., Irmak, Vallen, and Rozin 2011). Essay 2 examines the effect of food textures (e.g., crunchy versus chewy) on consumers’ psychological arousal levels. Results from four experiments and a field experiment show that chewing crunchy (versus chewy) foods lead to increased physiological arousal levels, and consumers strategically choose foods as a function of different textures (e.g., crunchy or chewy) to regulate their physiological arousal levels. Specifically, when people want to feel more awake and energetic, they are more likely to choose crunchy snacks over chewy snacks, whereas when they want to feel calmer and more relaxed, they are more likely to opt for chewy snacks. The results of both essays demonstrate the noticeable effects that sensory aspects of consumption (e.g., food packaging and food texture) have on consumers’ biological and psychological welfare.
dc.format.extent116 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMarketing
dc.titleYOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: HOW FOOD TEXTURE AND PACKAGING INFLUENCE CONSUMER WELL-BEING
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberLuo, Xueming
dc.contributor.committeememberEisenstein, Eric M.
dc.contributor.committeememberBlock, Lauren G.
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Marketing
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4060
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeD.B.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T19:50:45Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXYe-temple-0225E-13701.pdf
Size:
18.43Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record