Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDeckop, John Raymond
dc.creatorWong, Christopher Mark
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T19:50:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T19:50:41Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4052
dc.description.abstractBusiness leaders have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the organization and its shareholders. The decisions made by these leaders impact organizational performance. The power held by a CEO is not absolute because the board of directors has oversight responsibility. Depending on the level of governance, this creates a tension between the board and management. Beyond these two parties, there are a broad range of stakeholders who also exhibit influence and are increasingly socially conscious. This focus has made leaders more pressed to consider the need for initiatives related to corporate social responsibility (CSR), especially community engagement and diversity. As this study focused on CEO power and diversity, the research found support for the positive relationship between CEO power and select types of firm performance and the positive association between diversity and profitability. The second study continued to focus on organizations but focused on politics, organizational slack, and financial indicators. The research explored how political representation at the federal level is connected to the setting of organizational slack, which comes in various categories such as human, potential, and available. The slack resources are defined as excess capacity located within or outside of the firm and accessible immediately or in the future. The study aimed to determine if there was a connection between slack and financial outcomes, specifically returns on equity and assets, and credit risk ratings. An interaction effect of CEO power was also investigated on the relationship between slack and profitability. This research identified support for the positive relationship between politics and human slack and that of potential slack and profitability indicators with a moderation effect.
dc.format.extent229 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBusiness Administration
dc.titleCEO Power and Organizational Slack: An Examination of What Influences Company Performance through the Lens of Diversity and the Business Environment
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Theodore L.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcClendon, John A.
dc.contributor.committeememberIsaacs, Daniel
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Human Resource Management
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4034
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeD.B.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T19:50:41Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXWong-temple-0225E-14084.pdf
Size:
3.577Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record