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dc.contributor.advisorHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.creatorWong, Judy
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T19:50:40Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T19:50:40Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other904556440
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/4050
dc.description.abstractAmong those seeking treatment for a substance use disorder (SUD), the prevalence of a concurrent anxiety disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is surprisingly high, with some estimates placing the comorbidity rate at 33% to 43%. There is evidence that this comorbidity is associated with greater symptom severity, impairment, and substance use relapse than when the disorders present independently. One of the greatest challenges that clinicians face when presented with a patient with an anxiety disorder/PTSD and SUD is deciding how to approach treatment. Though the prevailing approach has been to treat the disorders sequentially, with the SUD receiving initial attention, there is a movement towards developing integrated or concurrent treatment models. The current meta-analytic study examined integrated or concurrent psychotherapies or pharmacotherapies for SUDs and anxiety disorders or PTSD. A meta-analysis on this topic is particularly important given the generally mixed findings of existing randomized controlled trials in this area of research. Our main question of interest was how integrated/concurrent treatments compared to single-target treatments. In addition, we explored whether there were outcome differences between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy, between anxiety disorders and PTSD, and differences based on treatment setting (e.g., substance use treatment center versus other settings). Our findings suggested that integrated or concurrent treatments were superior in reducing anxiety or PTSD symptoms, compared to treatments that only targeted substance use or anxiety/PTSD. The effect, however, was small. There was no evidence that integrated or concurrent treatments improved substance use outcomes in comparison to stand alone substance use treatment. We also found evidence that treatment studies conducted at substance use inpatient or outpatient programs produced smaller anxiety/PTSD effects. A trend was found suggesting combined psychotherapy-pharmacotherapy interventions may be more effective than psychotherapy alone. No difference was found between treatments targeting PTSD versus anxiety disorders. Implications of our findings are discussed.
dc.format.extent116 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectComorbidity
dc.subjectMeta-analysis
dc.subjectPtsd
dc.subjectSubstance Use
dc.subjectTreatment
dc.titleConcurrent Treatments of Substance Use Disorders with Anxiety or Trauma: A Comprehensive Meta-Analysis
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberEllman, Lauren
dc.contributor.committeememberFauber, Robert
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Michael
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas M.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/4032
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T19:50:40Z


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