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dc.contributor.advisorChein, Jason M.
dc.creatorWilmer, Henry Hawthorne
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:10:07Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:10:07Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3831
dc.description.abstractMobile electronic devices such as smartphones are playing an increasingly pervasive role in our daily activities. A growing body of literature is beginning to investigate how mobile technology habits might relate to individual differences in cognitive traits. The present study is an investigation into how individual differences in intertemporal preference, impulse control, and reward sensitivity, are predictive of the degree to which people engage with their smartphones, in two separate experiments. Experiment 1 utilized behavioral and self-reported measures for each of the aforementioned cognitive traits to examine their relationships with Mobile Technology Engagement (MTE) as defined in Wilmer & Chein (2016). The results replicated earlier work demonstrating that mobile technology engagement is positively correlated with a tendency to discount delayed rewards. A positive relationship was also observed between MTE and reward sensitivity. In an attempt to investigate the neural origins of the relationship observed in Experiment 1, Experiment 2 examined the association between mobile technology usage and white matter connectivity from the ventral striatum (vSTR) to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), pathways that have been previously implicated as biological markers for individual differences in intertemporal preference. Regression analyses revealed that both pathways predicted delay discounting performance, but only vSTR-vmPFC predicted mobile technology engagement. Taken together, the results of these two experiments provide important foundational evidence for both neural and cognitive factors that predict how individuals engage with mobile technology.
dc.format.extent63 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectCognition
dc.subjectImpulse Control
dc.subjectIntertemporal Preference
dc.subjectMobile Technology
dc.subjectReward Sensitivity
dc.subjectSmartphones
dc.titleNeural and Behavioral Evidence for a Link Between Mobile Technology Usage and Intertemporal Preference
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberOlson, Ingrid
dc.contributor.committeememberOlino, Thomas M.
dc.contributor.committeememberSteinberg, Laurence D.
dc.contributor.committeememberWeisberg, Robert W.
dc.contributor.committeememberVenkatraman, Vinod
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3813
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T16:10:07Z


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