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dc.contributor.advisorFarnsworth, Paul F.
dc.creatorWest-Rosenthal, Jesse Aaron
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:10:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:10:04Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3813
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on the history and archaeology of the American military encampments of the American Revolution. The organization of this dissertation reflects the purpose and methodology of the study to create context — both historically and archaeologically — for the American military encampments of the American Revolution, in order to understand the encampments’ design, implementation, and evolution over the course of the war. By employing a multifaceted approach towards the documentary record, this dissertation illustrates as many perspectives as possible by consulting a diverse collection of primary source material to construct a historical framework that explores how the military and the individual soldiers involved negotiated the theater of war during the encampment periods. Specific attention is paid to the orders that were handed down from the military hierarchy and how the soldiers reacted. This dissertation further refines the discussion of the American military encampments of the American Revolution by examining the physical remains of the encampments through the archaeological record. Utilizing information collected from nearly a century of archaeological investigations at places such as Middlebrook, New Jersey, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, Pluckemin, New Jersey, Redding, Connecticut, Morristown, New Jersey, and New Windsor, New York, this dissertation will provide a review and assessment of the archaeology of American military encampments of the American Revolution. In doing so, this dissertation examines the results these investigations have yielded and evaluates whether different approaches or a reevaluation of the results obtained from these investigations can provide new avenues of information to further interpret these historic sites. A case study is presented based on the author’s own excavations within the Valley Forge winter encampment on the grounds of the modern Washington Memorial Chapel. Through this case study, the physical and material remains of this encampment site are interpreted as expressions of the Continental Army’s adaptation to the landscape, as well as an expression of their status and training during this early stage of the war. Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben’s work is presented as a determining factor in this development. This dissertation uses the archaeological remains of these military landscapes to provide insight into the lifeways and power structures of the military as well as the soldiers who defined the social and economic disposition of this diverse community. Viewing each of these sites as a particular marker in time, this dissertation provides case studies of events over the course of the American Revolution to examine how the Army and its soldiers interact with the then-contemporary conflict, training, and the environment. Each of these influences played a role in the evolution of this military force.
dc.format.extent271 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectAmerican Revolution
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectEncampment
dc.subjectMilitary
dc.title“We are all going into log huts – a sweet life after a most fatiguing campaign”: The Evolution and Archaeology of American Military Encampments of the Revolutionary War
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberRanere, Anthony J.
dc.contributor.committeememberReeder-Myers, Leslie A.
dc.contributor.committeememberOrr, David Gerald
dc.contributor.committeememberVeit, Richard F.
dc.contributor.committeememberUrwin, Gregory J. W.
dc.description.departmentAnthropology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3795
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T16:10:04Z


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