• A Crisis of Identity: Advertising & the British Ministry of Information's Propaganda Posters of World War II

      Immerman, Richard H.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
    • Ambiguous Attacks on Democracy in Europe and the Americas: What can intergovernmental organizations do?

      Pollack, Mark; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2014)
      Past the time of traditional coups, today’s would-be dictators are seeking out more ambiguous ways to undercut democracy. These norm violations are often difficult to identify, and sometimes are conceived of as less threatening to outsiders. So, what can an intergovernmental organization do if its member states begin to violate common democratic norms in an ambiguous way? While some have claimed IGO action is determined by the violating state’s power or the pressure of third parties, few have explored the influence of an IGO’s structure and design on its decision to enforce norms. This paper explores some ambiguous measures being taken to undermine democracy, and seeks to disaggregate the complex process of IGO norm enforcement and subject the moving parts to initial scrutiny. In this paper, I assess the impact of five IGO characteristics on its decision to enforce democratic norms in member states: IGO composition or democratic density, democratic norm legalization, enforcement provisions, voting rules in the IGO’s intergovernmental branches, and delegation to the IGO’s supranational bodies. I develop six, independent hypotheses, relating one IGO characteristic to one aspect of the decision-making process. Using a pattern matching research design, I conduct a comparative case-study analysis of the Peruvian autogolpe facing the Organization of American States in 1992 and the Hungarian constitutional crisis challenging the European Union today to test each variable’s predicted effect.
    • An Examination in Social Engineering: The Susceptibility of Disclosing Private Security Information in College Students

      Rege, Aunshul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      While security technology can be nearly impenetrable, the people behind the computer screens are often easily manipulated, which makes the human factor the biggest threat to cybersecurity. This study examined whether college students disclosed private information about themselves, and what type of information they shared. The study utilized pretexting, in which attackers impersonate individuals in certain roles and often involves extensive research to ensure credibility. The goal of pretexting is to create situations where individuals feel safe releasing information that they otherwise might not. The pretexts used for this study were based on the natural inclination to help, where people tend to want to help those in need, and reciprocity, where people tend to return favors given to them. Participants (N=51) answered survey questions that they thought were for a good cause or that would result in a reward. This survey asked for increasingly sensitive information that could be used maliciously to gain access to identification, passwords, or security questions. Upon completing the survey, participants were debriefed on the true nature of the study and were interviewed about why they were willing to share information via the survey. Some of the most commonly skipped questions included “Student ID number” and “What is your mother’s maiden name?”. General themes identified from the interviews included the importance of similarities between the researcher and the subject, the researcher’s adherence to the character role, the subject’s awareness of question sensitivity, and the overall differences between online and offline disclosure. Findings suggest that college students are more likely to disclose private information if the attacker shares a similar trait with the target or if the attacker adheres to the character role they are impersonating. Additionally, this study sheds light on the research limitations, emphasizes the relevance of the human factor in security and privacy, and offers recommendations for future research.
    • Assessing the Cherry Pantry’s First Year of Operation and Planning for the Future

      Neuber, Amanda; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      This research examines how Temple University supports its food insecure students and what can be learned from other school’s support systems. This includes a broad survey of food security literature as well as a deeper review of how students experience the effects of food insecurity, and how the issue is further compounded depending on one’s gender or sexuality. An analysis of public data documenting food insecurity at Temple, in addition to interviews with Temple faculty and staff offer an insight into how well services like the Cherry Pantry are serving the student body. Identifying problems and successes is a crucial first step in improving student services, but this research then offers potential solutions for Temple by investigating what strategies have worked for other schools fighting food insecurity on their campuses. This research joins a growing body of literature that shows why food insecurity needs to be a major priority for all colleges and universities. A lack of access to affordable, nutritional food greatly affects the ability of students to live happy and successful lives and their ability to engage with their academic work.
    • Before and After Photography: The Makeover Method to Discipline and Punish

      Swann, Paul; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • Conical Intersections: The Seam Space Between the Sciences

      Matsika, Spiridoula; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      When molecules absorb light and become excited, the energy ultimately has to go somewhere; the energy can be lost by radiation, transferred to another molecule, or lost as heat. To predict how molecules interact with light and other matter, theoretical chemists use calculations based on the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation to numerically estimate energies and other properties of interest. Most processes can be explained within the bounds of the approximation; however, the spontaneous nonadiabatic loss of energy as heat cannot. These non- adiabatic processes are driven by conical intersections and play an important role in many known phenomena. Computationally, conical intersections rise out of the breakdown of the Born- Oppenheimer Approximation and the coupling of electronic and nuclear wavefunctions. Physically, conical intersections represent the seam space of degenerate electronic states on the potential energy surface of a molecule. Metaphorically, conical intersections represent the seam space of the research frontiers in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and computer science. The present work is a review of the work in, and application of, each respective field related to conical intersections and a benchmarking study of the most viable current methods used to calculate conical intersections.
    • Cracking Consensus: The Dominican Intervention, Public Opinion and Advocacy Organizations in the 1960s

      Goedde, Petra; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2011)
    • Development and Assessment of a Theater Group for People with Aphasia

      DeDe, Gayle; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      The Philadelphia Aphasia Community at Temple (PACT) utilizes a group therapy approach for people with aphasia (PWA) by providing opportunities for PWA to enhance communication skills in an interest-driven setting. Recent research demonstrates how theater can improve the communication of ideas through both non-verbal and verbal means and can offer a medium through which PWA can interact and share their experiences. The main goal of this project was to examine how theater has been used with PWA and how theater games and experiences can be adapted for PWA at PACT. Existing studies were reviewed in regard to the benefits of theater for people with communication disabilities and the theories underlying different theater games. These concepts were applied to a pilot theater group at PACT. Nine PWA attended six weekly sessions throughout Summer 2019, and eight PWA attended weekly sessions throughout the Fall 2019 semester. Sessions incorporated different theater games and activities to gauge interests and skills, with support from Physical Therapy. Pre-/post-group testing included the Communication Confidence Rating Scale for People with Aphasia and a theater survey examining participant’s interests, skills, and knowledge of theater. Results from pre-test and post-test were compared to determine changes in perception of theater, enjoyment, and overall benefits of a theater group for PWA.
    • Evaluation of Transcranial NIR Light Propagation for Photo-biomodulation of Neurons Using Mesh-Based Monte Carlo Modeling

      Patil, Chetan A.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      Research has shown that photo-biomodulation of neurons with near-infrared (NIR) light can stimulate their regeneration, and thus various research groups have developed devices that emit NIR light transcranially (through the skull) to stimulate neural growth in the brain in an effort to treat neurological diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer’s. However, it is not clear that clinical device designs illuminate cells in the brain with similar parameters as those shown effective for neuro-regeneration in pre-clinical work. This project employed computational modeling and simulations to assess the effect of device design parameters on transcranial light propagation, in order to optimize illumination of brain tissue and cells and thus ultimately improve clinical results of transcranial NIR-emitting devices for neuro-regeneration. Specifically, this project consisted of the development of two computational models for transcranial NIR-emitting devices and the evaluation of three device parameters: wavelength, photon number, and power density, on transcranial NIR light propagation.
    • Fenianism In Irish Catholic Philadelphia: The American Catholic Church's Battle for Acceptance

      Goedde, Petra; Varon, Elizabeth R.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2008)
    • From Civil Rights to Women's Liberation: Women's Rights in SDS and SNCC, 1960-1980

      Glasson, Travis; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
    • From Classroom to Battlefield: The Role of Students in the Closing of Carlisle Indian Industrial School, 1918

      Isenberg, Andrew C. (Andrew Christian); Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
    • 'Glory of Yet Another Kind': The Evolution & Politics of First-Wave Queer Activism, 1867-1924

      Lowe, Hilary I.; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2016)
    • High-Achieving Low-Income High School Students and their Awareness and Perceptions of Acceptance to Top-Tier Universities

      Neuber, Amanda; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      The purpose of this study is to determine specific barriers that prevent students in a high-achieving low-income (HALI) school from applying to selective colleges and universities. Currently, there is a drastically lower number of HALI students applying to the most selective higher education institutions (HEIs) in the United States in comparison to their equally academically successful high income peers. Prior research has shown that there are many known barriers that hinder HALI students from submitting their applications to selective HEIs, but there is no current research about the most persistent barrier that affects application submission. Therefore, this study is looking to find if the lack of HALI student applications to selective HEIs primarily stems from negative self-perceptions of ability, a lack of awareness of selective HEIs, or a misconception of the selectivity of HEIs. More specific knowledge of student experiences before and during the college application process can be used to better inform supports for HALI students leading up to and during the college application process.
    • Impact of Warm Water Anomalies on Phytoplankton Composition in the Santa Barbara Channel

      Houskeeper, Henry; Kudela, Raphe; Cordes, Eric; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2018)
      Ocean color remote sensing enables the study of sea surface temperature (SST) and phytoplankton on a large scale, although coastal systems remain a challenge due to their optical complexity. Here I focus on the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC), a complex coastal system that lies in the lee of Point Conception, which partially shelters the region from strong equatorward winds that flow along the central California coastline. I use a remote sensing abundance-based approach that partitions Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentrations by phytoplankton size class and functional type to estimate the underlying biomass composition. I validate the remote sensing classification method using matchups with in situ time series of phytoplankton abundance, and perform a regional spatial analysis of Chl-a and biomass composition in the SBC to improve understanding of how phytoplankton may respond to future ocean temperature shifts in coastal upwelling ecosystems. In 2005, delayed upwelling-favorable winds throughout the California Current System (CCS) triggered a warm water anomaly that coincided with increased levels of toxic dinoflagellate species. Then in 2013-2015 the oceanic phenomenon known as the Blob resulted in record water temperatures in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. I examine whether the Blob triggered a similar shift in phytoplankton composition in the SBC as during the 2005 warm water anomaly. As harmful algal blooms (HABs) become less predictable and occur more frequently in the CCS, improvements to remote sensing methods for studying phytoplankton must be made for largescale analyses. To gain a socioeconomic perspective of this issue in California, I interview fishermen local to the Santa Barbara region and examine the effects that toxic blooms and warm water events have on their businesses.
    • Keystone of the Keystone: The Falls of the Delaware and Bucks County 1609-1692

      Krueger, Rita; Glasson, Travis (Temple University. Libraries, 2010)
    • 'Men of instinct, impetuousness, and action': chivalry and the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland

      Glasson, Travis; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2015)
    • No Enemies to the Left: The Communist Party of the United States and Crises of International Communism, 1956-1968

      Goedde, Petra; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2012)
    • Other Worlds: A Multi-Disciplinary Portfolio of Alternative Realities

      Winch, Gregory; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2020)
      This project explores the human tendency of fleeing the real world and constructing a more desirable other. While the notion of creating an alternate world—worldbuilding as it is referred—may seem extremely individualistic, and therefore insular, personal worlds always have political implications and can, therefore, serve to critique larger cultural structures and societies. This paper will particularly analyze worldbuilding as an intentional process of constructing a new space without socially prescribed constraints that is in some way better than a person’s current reality. While worldbuilding is at times a survival tactic, can it simultaneously promote isolation from others? Additionally, if worldbuilding is a strategy to achieve other-worldly transcendence, what are the consequences of losing earthly ties? These questions are addressed through an exploration of the alternative worlds within the works of authors, artists, and characters of various countries and time periods, presenting the universal and timeless need to create an otherwise.
    • Paving the Road for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Imaging of Myelin

      Patil, Chetan A.; Lemay, Michel; Temple University. Honors Program (Temple University. Libraries, 2019)
      Demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), result in the deterioration of the myelin sheath that covers the neural cells of the brain. A microscopy method that can be used to assess the effectiveness of therapeutics aimed at healing demyelinating diseases and to further study these diseases is needed. Specifically, a microscopy method with high specificity to myelin and low photobleaching of myelin is needed. Photobleaching is the fading of fluorescence after repeated cycles of excitation. Currently, fluorescence microscopy and similar methods that result in photobleaching and use dyes have been used to visualize the myelin. Dyes, however, stain tissue samples and may affect molecular functions. Besides these methods, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has also been used. In contrast to other used microscopy methods, CARS microscopy’s photobleaching can be minimized, and CARS microscopy does not use stains. As an initial step toward investigating the ability of the CARS microscope to visualize different levels of myelin, which consists primarily of lipids, and to demonstrate CARS value for use in studying demyelinating diseases and in the development of therapeutic efficacy of drugs developed to treat MS; CARS imaging of lipid droplets in engineered adipose tissue was performed, and quantification and measurement of the lipid droplets was done. In addition, a mini incubation chamber for long-term in vitro imaging of demyelination was built, and a protocol for a demyelination study has been developed.