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dc.contributor.advisorEisenstein, Eric M.
dc.creatorWang, Shih-Ching
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:09:59Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:09:59Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.other864886053
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3781
dc.description.abstractMost consequential decisions are made by more than two people. People frequently argue with each other to make better decisions. However, most decision making research usually only involves small purchases and individual decisions. The lacking of investigation in high-cognition decisions and argumentative settings is the motivation of this research. Researchers studying decision making have largely focused on how the decisions that people make are affected by task characteristics, and how labile decisions are with respect to situational factors. However, the fact that many preferences are constructed does not imply that all constructions are equally good. That people differ from each other in thinking is obvious. How and why they differ is less clear. Therefore, the first two studies are foundational studies in order to find out the most important and germane individual difference factor that may be the best predictor of thinking ability, including argument generation quality, evaluation ability, and debiasing ability. I found that logical reasoning ability is the best predictor of both thinking and debiasing ability. Argumentative Theory (Mercier & Sperber, 2011) claims that when reasoning is used in argumentative contexts, the confirmation bias contributes to an efficient form of division of cognitive labor, and then lead to better decisions and attitude depolarization. In study 3, I provided implication evidence to show that either arguing with the other person or viewing arguments from the opposite perspective may lead to attitude depolarization. Most interestingly, individual differences did moderate the main effects.
dc.format.extent165 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMarketing
dc.subjectAttitude Polarization
dc.subjectDecision Making
dc.subjectIndividual Differences
dc.subjectThinking Ability
dc.subjectThinking Biases
dc.titleINDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCE AND DEBIASING STRATEGIES IN THINKING BIASES AND ATTITUDE POLARIZATION
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDi Benedetto, C. Anthony
dc.contributor.committeememberFong, Nathan
dc.contributor.committeememberChakravarti, Dipankar
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Marketing
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3763
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T16:09:59Z


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