Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAbarry, Abu Shardow
dc.contributor.advisorAsante, Molefi Kete
dc.creatorAmatokwu, Buashie
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:09:49Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:09:49Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.other864884493
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3717
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the roles, themes, techniques and contexts of composition in hip-hop. It seeks to explain how hip-hop artists view and define their work, while also taking into consideration the viewpoints of other participants in the marketing pool of hip-hop production and consumption. The conceptual plan on which the study is based is Afrocentric; coupled with Ethnographic method of data processing and interpretation. This method is comprised of personal interviews, participant observation, sonic analysis and the use of bibliographic entries and notes that allows for sense and meaning in text. Also used are documented data, which contain descriptions of hip-hop lyrics, interviews, opinions, journalistic notes, and scholarly reports as a means of evolving a cohesive sense of the message's intent, opinion, knowledge of its roles, themes, techniques, images, and contexts The study found that the issues and themes that dominate hip-hop include bondage impairment, concern over currently warped social values and trends, and challenges over oppressive cultural values and social institutions. The artists whose compositions and renderings were used for the purpose of this study not only demonstrated an ability to isolate and construct themes about issues, but were also familiar with the issues that reveal them as agents for the liberation of the minds of their Diaspora Africa peoples and communities. Their music and grassroots commentaries were found to be appropriately designed to persuade their targeted audience to greater awareness. They conveyed messages that encouraged positive attitude and behavioral change in respect to addressed themes that were, in the main, issues of disenfranchisement. They addressed negative, disapproving behaviors which the atmosphere of disenfranchisement has spurned, and were being expressed through the media of the hip-hop rap musicals. The study also highlights the connection between classical African musical expressions and postmodern Diaspora African musical innovations.
dc.format.extent241 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectHistory, African
dc.subjectBlack Studies
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectHip Hop Musical Art Composition
dc.titleAn Afrocentric Analysis of Hip Hop Musical Art Composition and production: Roles, Themes, Techniques, and Contexts
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberNorment, Nathaniel
dc.contributor.committeememberNaʼallah, Abdul Rasheed
dc.description.departmentAfrican American Studies
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3699
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T16:09:49Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
umi-temple-1090.pdf
Size:
744.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record