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dc.contributor.advisorKendall, Philip C.
dc.creatorBarmish, Andrea J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T16:09:48Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T16:09:48Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.other864884445
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3711
dc.description.abstractCognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for anxious youth; however, approximately 30% of youths continue to meet diagnostic criteria for their primary anxiety disorder at posttreatment. Efforts to identify predictors and moderators of outcome in CBT are encouraged in order to enhance treatment efficacy. One potential predictor is youth pretreatment self-disclosure (e.g. Panichelli-Mindel, Flannery-Schroeder, Kendall, & Angelosante, 2005). Using a sample of 101 Anxiety Disordered (AD) youths meeting criteria for a primary diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD), or Social Phobia (SOP) who were treated with 16-weeks of CBT (individual or family), this study examined (a) youth self-disclosure as a predictor of CBT outcomes, (b) pre- to post-treatment change in disclosure and distress during disclosure task, for responders relative to nonresponders, (c) disclosure and distress while disclosing in anxious youth relative to community volunteers (N=74); and (d) disclosure and distress while disclosing in treatment responders and nonresponders (posttreatment), and community volunteers. Videotaped recordings of a four-minute Youth Speech Sample (YSS) in which the youth was instructed to talk about him/herself were coded by reliable coders who were blind to diagnostic status, using the Youth Self-Disclosure Rating Scale (YSDRS) for each of the variables of interest (Feared Situations, Personal Content, Global Rating of Disclosure, and Distress while Disclosing). Text analysis software was used to measure Disclosure Language. Treatment outcome was measured using posttreatment diagnostic status and severity, youth self-report, and mother- and father-reports. Findings of the present study indicate that pretreatment disclosure does not predict CBT outcomes for anxious youth. Additionally, there were no differences in the pre- to post-treatment change in disclosure and distress for responders and nonresponders; however, a main effect of treatment on disclosure of personal content was observed, such that youths disclosed more at posttreatment relative to pretreatment. Anxious youths appear more distressed in the disclosure task relative to community volunteers, but groups do not differ in their level of disclosure. Similarly, treatment responders and nonresponder at posttreatment were rated as more distressed while disclosing relative to community volunteers, but do not differ in their level of disclosure. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent116 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical
dc.titleSelf-disclosure as a predictor of outcomes in cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxious youth
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFauber, Robert L.
dc.contributor.committeememberGiovannetti, Tania
dc.contributor.committeememberDrabick, Deborah A.
dc.contributor.committeememberAlloy, Lauren B.
dc.contributor.committeememberWeisberg, Robert W.
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3693
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T16:09:48Z


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