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dc.contributor.advisorWaldstreicher, David
dc.creatorSullivan, Aaron
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T15:02:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T15:02:04Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other890207798
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3616
dc.description.abstractA significant number of Pennsylvanians were not, in any meaningful sense, either revolutionaries or loyalists during the American War for Independence. Rather, they were disaffected from both sides in the imperial dispute, preferring, when possible, to avoid engagement with the Revolution altogether. The British Occupation of Philadelphia in 1777 and 1778 laid bare the extent of this popular disengagement and disinterest, as well as the dire lengths to which the Patriots would go to maintain the appearance of popular unity. Driven by a republican ideology that relied on popular consent in order to legitimate their new governments, American Patriots grew increasingly hostile, intolerant, and coercive toward those who refused to express their support for independence. By eliminating the revolutionaries' monopoly on military force in the region, the occupation triggered a crisis for the Patriots as they saw popular support evaporate. The result was a vicious cycle of increasing alienation as the revolutionaries embraced ever more brutal measures in attempts to secure the political acquiescence and material assistance of an increasingly disaffected population. The British withdrawal in 1778, by abandoning the region's few true loyalists and leaving many convinced that American Independence was now inevitable, shattered what little loyalism remained in the region and left the revolutionaries secure in their control of the state. In time, this allowed them to take a more lenient view of disaffection and move toward modern interpretations of silence as acquiescence and consent for the established government.
dc.format.extent333 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAmerican History
dc.subjectHistory, Military
dc.subjectAmerican Revolution
dc.subjectDisaffection
dc.subjectLoyalty
dc.subjectOccupation
dc.subjectPhiladelphia
dc.subjectRevolutionary War
dc.titleIn But Not Of the Revolution: Loyalty, Liberty, and the British Occupation of Philadelphia
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberUrwin, Gregory J. W., 1955-
dc.contributor.committeememberKlepp, Susan E.
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Buskirk, Judith L.
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3598
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T15:02:04Z


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