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dc.contributor.editorInnamorati, Marco
dc.creatorOlino, Thomas
dc.creatorFinsaas, Megan
dc.creatorDougherty, Lea R.
dc.creatorKlein, Daniel N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-20T15:29:43Z
dc.date.available2020-04-20T15:29:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-31
dc.identifier.citationOlino TM, Finsaas M, Dougherty LR and Klein DN (2018) Is Parent–Child Disagreement on Child Anxiety Explained by Differences in Measurement Properties? An Examination of Measurement Invariance Across Informants and Time. Front. Psychol. 9:1295. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01295
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/35
dc.description.abstractThere are numerous empirical studies demonstrating that agreement between parent-reports of youth and youth self-reports of internalizing behavior problems is modest at best. This has spurred much research on factors that influence the magnitude of associations between informants, including individual difference characteristics of the informants and contexts through which individuals interact with the child. There is also tremendous interest in understanding symptom trajectories longitudinally. However, each of these lines of work are predicated on the assumptions that the psychometric construct that is being assessed from each informant and at each measurement occasion is the same. This study examined measurement invariance between maternal and child reports and longitudinally across ages 9 and 12 on five dimensions of anxiety using the Screen for Child Anxiety and Related Disorders (SCARED; Birmaher et al., 1999). No cross-informant models for anxiety dimensions achieved acceptable fit and at least partial metric and scalar invariance. Moreover, few longitudinal models demonstrated acceptable fit and at least partial metric and scalar invariance. Thus, using the SCARED as an example, these results show that inter-informant agreement may be compromised by different item functioning, and highlight the need for testing invariance before using measures for longitudinal tracking of symptoms.
dc.format.extent11 pages
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.relation.ispartofOpen Access Publishing Fund (OAPF)
dc.relation.haspartFrontiers in Psychology (Quantitative Psychology and Measurement), Vol. 9, Article 1295
dc.relation.isreferencedbyFrontiers
dc.rightsAttribution CC BY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectMeasurement invariance
dc.subjectAnxiety
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectParent–child agreement
dc.subjectAssessment
dc.titleIs Parent–Child Disagreement on Child Anxiety Explained by Differences in Measurement Properties? An Examination of Measurement Invariance Across Informants and Time
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreArticle (Other)
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.relation.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01295
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.schoolcollegeTemple University. College of Liberal Arts
dc.description.sponsorTemple University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund, 2017-2018 (Philadelphia, Pa.)|
dc.creator.orcid0000-0001-5139-8571
dc.temple.creatorOlino, Thomas M.
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-20T15:29:43Z


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