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dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorZiskin, Marvin C.
dc.creatorSlovinsky, William Stanley
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T15:02:00Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T15:02:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.other958157504
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3581
dc.description.abstractA “millimeter wave” (MMW) is an electromagnetic oscillation with a wavelength between 1 and 10 mm, and a corresponding frequency of 30 to 300 GHz. In the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, this band falls above the frequencies of radio waves and microwaves, and below that of infrared radiation. Since the 1950s, frequencies in this regime have been used for short range communications and beginning in the 1970s, a form of therapy known as “millimeter wave therapy” (MWT) , or microwave resonance therapy, in some publications. This form of therapy has been widely used in the republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). As of 1995, it is estimated that more than one thousand medical centers in the FSU have performed MWT and more than three million patients have received this method of treatment. Despite the abundant use of this form of medicine, very little is known about the mechanisms by which it works. Early accounts of use are limited to Soviet government documents, largely unavailable to the scientific public, and limited translations and oral accounts from FSU scientists and literature reviews . This anecdotal body of evidence lacks the scrutiny of peer-reviewed journal publications. In order to gain more widespread acceptance in Western medicine, the pathway through which this regime of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum affects the human body must be rigorously mapped and quantified. Despite the anecdotal nature of a large portion of the existing research on biological MMW effects, a common link is the idea of an interaction occurring at the skin level, which is transduced into a signal used at a remote location in the body. This study explores a possible mechanism for the generation of this signal. The effects of therapeutic frequency MMW on the ionic currents through two different types of ion transport channels were studied, and the results are discussed with emphasis on how they relate to possible changes in nerve signals used by the body for communication between tissues in remote locations.
dc.format.extent110 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEngineering
dc.subjectEngineering, Biomedical
dc.subjectPhysics
dc.subjectAlternative Therapy
dc.subjectMillimeter Wave
dc.titleMeasurement and Simulation of Ionic Current as a Means of Quantifying Effects of Therapeutic Millimeter Wave Radiation
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberPeridier, Vallorie J.
dc.contributor.committeememberObeid, Iyad, 1975-
dc.contributor.committeememberFoster, William J.
dc.description.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3563
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T15:02:00Z


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