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dc.contributor.advisorBailey, Beth L., 1957-
dc.creatorRoyles, Dan
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T15:01:48Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T15:01:48Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other881265405
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3500
dc.description.abstractThis project reveals the untold story of African Americans AIDS activists' fight against HIV and AIDS in black communities. I describe the ways that, from 1985 to 2003, the both challenged public and private granting agencies to provide funds for HIV prevention efforts aimed specifically at black communities, and challenged homophobic attitudes among African Americans that, they believed, perpetuated the spread of the disease through stigma and silence. At the same time, they connected the epidemic among African Americans to racism and inequality within the United States, as well as to the pandemic raging throughout the African Diaspora and in the developing world. In this way, I argue, they contested and renegotiated the social and spatial boundaries of black community in the context of a devastating epidemic. At the same time, I also argue, they borrowed political strategies from earlier moments of black political organizing, as they brought key questions of diversity, equality, and public welfare to bear on HIV and AIDS. As they fought for resources with which to stop HIV and AIDS from spreading within their communities, they struggled over the place of blackness amid the shifting politics of race, class, and health in post-Civil Rights America. Adding their story to the emerging narrative of the history of the epidemic thus yields a more expansive and radical picture of AIDS activism in the United States.
dc.format.extent281 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAmerican History
dc.subjectAfrican American Studies
dc.subjectGlbt Studies
dc.subjectActivism
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectAfrican Diaspora
dc.subjectHealthcare
dc.subjectHiv/aids
dc.subjectSocial Movements
dc.title"DON'T WE DIE TOO?": THE POLITICAL CULTURE OF AFRICAN AMERICAN AIDS ACTIVISM
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFarber, David R.
dc.contributor.committeememberSimon, Bryant
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Heather Ann, 1963-
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Alondra
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3482
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-05T15:01:48Z


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