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dc.contributor.advisorWoyshner, Christine A.
dc.creatorPennington, Alicia
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T17:01:00Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T17:01:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.other958156505
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3396
dc.description.abstractIn 1959, as a reaction to the 1954 Supreme Court's Brown vs Board of Education desegregation decision all public schools in Prince Edward County, Virginia were closed. This dissertation explores one group's response to the schools closings by examining the patterns of resilience that emerged among a group of African American women in Farmville, Prince Edward County, Virginia. Using a multi-disciplinary synthesis of research in education, history, geography, sociology, social movements, personal interviews and questionnaires this dissertation investigated the development of resilience at the grassroots level. African American women are taught early in their socialization process the value of independence, mutual aid, religiosity, community stability, and respect for elders. The school closings didn't just affect the children of Farmville, it changed families and communities, but most particularly it changed the lives of Farmville's women. Much of the research demonstrates that resilience and activism in oppressed communities has a dual nature that surfaces when those communities are under stress. Resilience among this group of African American women emerged both organically and as a result of their religious and community involvements. ii African American women experienced the cultural, educational, contextual, social, behavioral, and political worlds in Farmville, Virginia, from an "outsider within" perspective. When they stepped outside their socially and psychologically constricted lives they developed resilience fortified with both historic and personal commitment. In examining broadly the history of education in Virginia, the historic allegiances of African American women to community, religion, identity, education, and place a fuller understanding of the processes of the development of resilience emerges. This examination moved Black women from the margins to the center of the debate on resilience. The development of personal agency in Farmville was courageous and could have been physically dangerous. However, as the civil rights movement captured the American consciousness, the women of Farmville engaged in a unique social movement that would sustain a campaign for education parity.
dc.format.extent238 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectAfrican American Studies
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.subjectBlack Women
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectResilience
dc.titleA Thumping From Within Unanswered By Any Beckoning From Without: Resilience Among African American Women, Farmville, Virginia 1951-1963
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcNamara-Horvat, Erin
dc.contributor.committeememberJordan, Will J.
dc.contributor.committeememberMasucci, Michele M.
dc.description.departmentUrban Education
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3378
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T17:01:00Z


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