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dc.contributor.advisorKaplan, Avi
dc.creatorNeuber Haggerty, Amanda
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T17:00:50Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T17:00:50Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3336
dc.description.abstractWhat does it mean to be “smart?” Being identified as intelligent, gifted, or high achieving affords students stimulating experiences, motivating social environments, and advanced educational and career opportunities. However, research has also identified potential negative psychological and social costs to being labeled smart. These are particularly apparent during transitions. Many “smart” students begin college while expecting to continue to achieve highly. But, the first-year of college is a time of intense change, with new peers, different requirements, and unfamiliar standards for success that can raise questions about how smart one really is. Students respond differently to such challenging experiences and questions; some are intimidated, some prevail, others even thrive. Why? The current study investigated the meaning of being labeled smart as part of the identity and experiences of honors students in the first year of college. Twenty-four first year Honors students at a large, urban university were interviewed about the meaning of being smart and their experiences in the first year in college. Data analysis was framed deductively by an emerging identity model—the Dynamic Systems Method of Role Identity (DSMRI)—and inductively by an Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The dissertation presents six cases that were purposively selected to display variability in students’ meaning-making about being smart, identity, and experiences. The results demonstrate how each student’s meaning of smartness has been incorporated into her or his identity system within the particular educational context, and how it framed their experiences, decisions, and coping with challenging situations. The findings further demonstrate the differences in the ways individual students made meaning of the smart label, the multiple values of being smart particularly in regards to peer relations, complex negative psychosocial implications, and the important role of educational contexts in these meaning-making and identity formation processes. The findings can inform educators and researchers who aim to investigate and address students’ maladaptive beliefs and behaviors and to support their healthy identity development.
dc.format.extent191 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducational Psychology
dc.subjectEducation, Higher
dc.subjectCollege
dc.subjectHigh-achieving
dc.subjectHonors
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectSmart
dc.titleTHE MEANING OF BEING SMART: AN IDENTITY STUDY OF FIRST-YEAR HONORS COLLEGE STUDENTS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberByrnes, James P.
dc.contributor.committeememberHindman, Annemarie H.
dc.contributor.committeememberPatterson, Timothy J.
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3318
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T17:00:50Z


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