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dc.contributor.advisorReilly, Jamie
dc.creatorMancinelli, James Mark
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:10:12Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:10:12Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.other974918977
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3231
dc.description.abstractSelf-disclosure is a commonly used therapeutic technique with people who stutter to facilitate self-acceptance and reduce the effects that the stigmatizing views and stereotypes held by the public can have on their communicative interactions. Although there are data on the benefits of self-disclosure from the perspective of the listener, there are no data on the value of self-disclosure form the perspective of the person who stutters. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefit of self-disclosure from the perspective of the person who stutters in a conversational interaction using a Map task with a normally fluent speaker. The cognitive-affective variables under investigation were self-perception of stuttering severity, comfort, cognitive effort, anxiety, and benefit in a disclosed and non-disclosed condition. The speech variables under consideration in the disclosed and non-disclosed conditions were total syllables, percent syllables stuttered, and total word count. In order to measure level of stigma, the Self-Stigma of Stuttering Scale (4S) (Boyle, 2012) was used. Participants were 25 adults (18-73 years of age) recruited from the La Salle University Speech-Language-Hearing Clinics, National Stuttering Association support groups in Philadelphia and New Jersey, and through social media. The results of the investigation revealed that the participants were equivocal about the benefit of self-disclosure, and that there were non-significant differences for the cognitive-affective variables across conditions. Some positive effects on the speech variables were noted in the non-disclosed state only. All participants demonstrated overall self-stigma based on their 4S scores, but stigma was not acting as a moderating variable for the cognitive-affective or speech variables. It was concluded that from the perspective of the person who stutters, neither self-disclosure nor overall level of self-stigma are playing a decisive role during the communicative interaction with a normally fluent speaker. The implications of these findings are discussed.
dc.format.extent121 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBehavioral Sciences
dc.subjectSpeech Therapy
dc.subjectSociology
dc.subjectGoffman
dc.subjectSelf-disclosure
dc.subjectSociological
dc.subjectStigma
dc.subjectStuttering
dc.titleThe Effects of Self-Disclosure on the Communicative Interaction Between a Person Who Stutters and a Normally Fluent Speaker
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHammer, Carol S.
dc.contributor.committeememberHeuer, Reinhardt J.
dc.contributor.committeememberBoyle, Michael C.
dc.contributor.committeememberAmster, Barbara J.
dc.contributor.committeememberWasik, Barbara A.
dc.description.departmentCommunication Sciences
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3213
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:10:12Z


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