Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKrueger, Rita
dc.contributor.advisorGoedde, Petra, 1964-
dc.creatorLytwyn, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:10:10Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:10:10Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other890207768
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3219
dc.description.abstractOn November 4, 1956, Soviet forces brutally suppressed the Hungarian Revolution in Budapest. Although Nikita Khrushchev had attempted to "repair" the Soviet Union's image by denouncing Stalin's crimes, the Soviet invasion of Hungary damaged the Soviet Union's legitimacy in the international community. This thesis examines the popular and religious press' coverage of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. By publishing anticommunist editorials and letters to the editor, the popular press furthered the phenomenon known as Cold War Consensus. Historians have looked at Cold War Consensus as a conscious political project created by a number of individuals and institutions. This thesis emphasizes the role of the popular and religious press as agents in the solidification of the Cold War Consensus. Most notable was the popular and religious press' use of the victimization narrative. By portraying the Hungarian freedom fighters as victims of the Soviet system, the popular and religious press condemned the Soviet Union's actions while extolling "American values" such as democracy, freedom, and charity. The popular and religious press' treatment of Soviet brutality also built a sensationalized image of Hungarian refugees. The emphasis on Soviet savagery and narrative centered on incoming Hungarian refugees as heroes strengthened anticommunist rhetoric that was typical during the 1950s.
dc.format.extent59 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAmerican History
dc.subjectWorld History
dc.subjectCold War Consensus
dc.subjectHungarian Revolution
dc.subjectHungary
dc.subjectPopular Press
dc.subjectRefugees
dc.subjectReligion
dc.title"The Love of America is on Move:" Victimization, Cold War Consensus, and the Hungarian Revolution, 1956-1957
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGoedde, Petra, 1964-
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3201
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:10:10Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXLytwyn-temple-0225M-117 ...
Size:
723.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record