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dc.contributor.advisorWaidzunas, Thomas J.
dc.creatorLevine, Ethan Czuy
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:10:03Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:10:03Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3181
dc.description.abstractIn 1987, statistics transformed rape from a rare and personal concern into an epidemic in popular consciousness. Mary Koss and colleagues conducted victimization surveys with thousands of college women, 1 in 4 of whom reported completed or attempted rape. This finding received tremendous attention in the 1980s, and continues to influence activists and state officials. Notwithstanding the importance of this and other scientific facts, scholars have rarely explored the role of scientists in shaping perceptions of and responses to sexual violence. This project addresses that gap in the literature, via the following questions: (1) how have scientists conceptualized sexual violence among adults; and (2) what social mechanisms enable, constrain, and otherwise influence scientific research on sexual violence? Drawing on insights from feminist science studies, I approach sexual violence as an intra-active phenomenon, and regard objects of study (sexual violence) as inseparable from agencies of observation (research instruments, researchers). Data came from three sources: content analysis of journal abstracts (N=1,313), in-depth assessment of texts in different subfields (N=84), and interviews with researchers (N=31). Ultimately, I argue that sexual violence research has been dominated by psychological inquiries, as well as gendered assumptions regarding who is most capable of perpetrating and experiencing rape. Scientists have produced a tremendous body of knowledge regarding the individual-level causes, individual-level outcomes, and prevalence of men’s sexual aggression toward women. Systemic forces and sexual violence that deviates from this particular gendered pattern remain underexamined. I further argue that scientific research on sexual violence is shaped by a range of social mechanisms that are particular to fields associated with questions of social morality and social movements including feminism(s).
dc.format.extent298 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectSociology
dc.subjectGender Studies
dc.subjectScience History
dc.subjectAgential Realism
dc.subjectFeminism
dc.subjectLgbt
dc.subjectRape
dc.subjectScience and Technology Studies
dc.subjectSexual Assault
dc.titleStudying Rape: The Production of Scientific Knowledge about Sexual Violence in the United States and Canada
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberLevitt, Laura
dc.contributor.committeememberVila, Pablo
dc.contributor.committeememberChincholkar-Mandelia, Rujuta
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3163
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:10:03Z


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