Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorToran, Laura E.
dc.creatorKanaley, Chelsea Noelle
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:09:46Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:09:46Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3082
dc.description.abstractThe Wissahickon Creek is an urban stream that runs through Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties and discharges to the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia. A majority of stream segments in the Wissahickon watershed are considered impaired by the USEPA due to sediment and nutrients. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) were implemented in 2003 for nutrients (NO3-, PO43-, NO2-, and CBOD5) and siltation. A new TMDL for total phosphorus (TP) was proposed in 2015, despite minimal data on the effectiveness of the 2003 TMDLs. This new proposal was met with concern, suggesting more data must be collected to better understand impairment in the Wissahickon Creek. The purpose of this research was to study turbidity and nutrient responses to storm events, as storm events are known to contribute significant loads of both sediment and nutrients. Twelve sites were chosen for high frequency turbidity and water level monitoring along the Wissahickon Creek and one of its main tributaries, Sandy Run. These sites were selected around three of the major wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to determine the relative roles of WWTPs and overland flow as sources of turbidity and nutrients during storm events. The upstream site and first downstream site at each WWTP were monitored for nutrients during storms using high frequency loggers and ISCO automatic samplers. Stream assessments were done at each site to characterize in-stream physical parameters, bank vegetation, and algae cover. High frequency turbidity data suggests that the turbidity is locally sourced, as turbidity peaks at the same time as water level, or within an hour or two, at all sites regardless of storm size. Comparisons of the turbidity response with in-stream parameters and land cover helped determine that the main factor driving the turbidity response is discharge, although bank topping and impervious cover, particularly roads, may increase turbidity responses at some sites. Similarities in nutrient, turbidity, and conductivity responses upstream and downstream of the WWTPs strongly suggest that overland flow, not WWTP effluent, is the major source of nutrients and sediment during storm events. Finally, a strong relationship between total phosphorus and high turbidity suggests that only during high discharge events is there a significant increase in TP in the Wissahickon Creek. Results from this research identify the source of turbidity and nutrients to the Wissahickon Creek during storms as primarily coming from overland flow, that the primary factor controlling the turbidity response is discharge, with some secondary influence from over-banking and the contribution of roads to land use, and a close link between TP concentrations and sediment during storms in the stream.
dc.format.extent220 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectGeology
dc.subjectHydrologic Sciences
dc.subjectHydrology
dc.subjectNutrients
dc.subjectTurbidity
dc.subjectUrban Stream
dc.titleTurbidity and Nutrient Response to Storm Events in the Wissahickon Creek, Suburban Philadelphia, PA
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberChemtob, Steven M.
dc.contributor.committeememberKim, Bojeong
dc.description.departmentGeology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3064
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeM.S.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:09:46Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXKanaley-temple-0225M-13 ...
Size:
6.005Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record