Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBelenko, Steven R.
dc.creatorJohnson, Ingrid Diane
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:09:44Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:09:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3069
dc.description.abstractIntimate partner violence (IPV) survivors often consult with their informal network members (i.e., friends and family) about the violence they experience- far more often than they do with formal resources. These informal network members (INMs) are therefore uniquely situated to help survivors, particularly by helping them understand the violence as an undeserved problem and by providing them with tangible aid and information to exit and stay free of violent relationships. The extent to which and through what means INMs could help, however, remains under-studied. This study therefore sought to understand how disclosure to informal network members (INMs) and their specific reactions to that disclosure shape survivors’ initial experiences with IPV and their IPV victimization in subsequent relationships. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate quantitative analyses (linear, logistic, and negative binomial regression) were conducted on survey responses from a sample of 200 female survivors between the ages of 18 and 30 who had been out of their initial violent relationships for at least 6 months. These analyses included the use of six independent variables (four measures of disclosure, one measure of reactions to disclosure that labeled the violence as problematic, and one measure of reactions to disclosure that provided information or tangible support), three dependent variables (months between violence onset and relationship end, frequency of violence during exposure to violence, and subsequent violent relationships), and ten covariates. Increases in disclosure frequency were significantly related to decreases in the frequency of violence across three different measures of disclosure in the multivariate models. Although the bivariate findings suggested that disclosure is related to time between violence onset and the end of the relationship, the multivariate results did not find a significant relationship with this variable, nor between disclosure and subsequent violent relationships. The results were more nuanced when examining the specifics of the INM reactions to those disclosures in the multivariate models. Each increase in the frequency of problem definition reactions was associated with a decrease in the frequency of violence experienced. Increasing frequencies in urging the survivor to talk to a lawyer or police and in providing or helping her get information were related to a decrease in the time between violence onset and relationship end. Increases in the frequency of urging the survivor to talk to a lawyer or police were related to an increase in the frequency of violence, whereas increases in the frequency of offering a place to stay was related to a decrease in the frequency of violence. Lastly, an increase in the frequency of information and tangible support reactions as a whole was significantly related to a decrease in the odds of experiencing subsequent relationship violence. These findings add nuance to existing models and frameworks of IPV help-seeking, motivate and serve as a basis for further research into how disclosure to INMs can shape varying outcomes for IPV survivors, and add to a body of literature that can ultimately be used to inform not only the practices of INMs, but also more formal policies and practices to enable informal systems to better aid IPV survivors. Regarding implications for theories of help-seeking and disclosure, the findings confirm that although disclosure itself is important, what happens during disclosure is just as, if not more, important when shaping outcomes for survivors. Further, because of the varied ways in which the disclosure process might shape survivor outcomes as evidenced by these findings, conceptual models and frameworks outlining the relationships between disclosure and survivor outcomes need to be refined to better capture these complexities. In terms of future research, there is much left to explore regarding the disclosure process, including for which types of survivors certain reactions work best, which types of INMs are most likely to use which reactions, and how combinations of reactions interact in influencing survivor outcomes. Once corroborated by other studies, these findings can be used to inform policy and programming to enable INMs to react effectively to disclosure so as to ensure greater justice for survivors. Any awareness-raising policies or programs designed to shape INM practice would need to be evaluated, creating a variety of evaluative research opportunities. Because of the high prevalence of IPV among young adult women in the United States and around the world, the results of this study fit well into the contemporary global discussion of how to reduce and prevent survivor experiences with IPV.
dc.format.extent206 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCriminology
dc.subjectDisclosure
dc.subjectHelp Seeking
dc.subjectInformal Network Members
dc.subjectIntimate Partner Violence
dc.titleSURVIVOR EXPERIENCES WITH INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND DISCLOSURE TO INFORMAL NETWORK MEMBERS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberAuerhahn, Kathleen
dc.contributor.committeememberWood, Jennifer
dc.contributor.committeememberEdwards, Katie M.
dc.description.departmentCriminal Justice
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3051
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:09:44Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXJohnson-temple-0225E-13 ...
Size:
1.944Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record