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dc.contributor.advisorChurchill, Eton
dc.creatorIshikawa, Yukiko
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:09:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:09:41Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3051
dc.description.abstractIn this case study, I investigate the development of first-year Japanese students’ self-regulated learning skills and the role of language learning advising in their transition to college. A great deal of research on the first-year experience has focused on a sense of belonging and the quality of friendships, but few researchers have investigated how learning habits influence first-year students’ successful adjustment to college life. Meanwhile, research on language learning advising has largely focused on learner strategies, a framework that has been met with increasing criticism (e.g., Dörnyei, 2005). Accordingly, for this study I adopt Zimmerman’s self-regulated learning (SRL) framework to examine the participants’ ability to transition to independent learning during their first year at a junior college in Japan. Furthermore, I aim to investigate the relation between SRL and foreign language learning and explore how advising in language learning can help learners to self-regulate their learning. The participants are 15 first-year students enrolled in a women’s junior college in Japan. The data were collected by conducting interviews, recording advising sessions, and obtaining documents. A series of four semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant over the course of eight months in their first year. Advising sessions with seven participants were also recorded. Each advising session lasted for half an hour and the number of advising sessions varied from one to eight times depending on the participant. Documents related to the college and materials relevant to the participants’ self-study were also collected. In addition, key administrators and faculty members were interviewed. The data were analyzed using three coding methods in two cycles: Eclectic Coding, Hypothesis Coding, and Axial Coding (Saldaña, 2013). Following this analysis, single-case and cross-case analyses were conducted (Yin, 2014). The findings suggest that there was a great variance in the level of SRL skill development among the participants. Some learners had already developed some SRL skills prior to entering college and built on their skills in their first year in college. Others experimented with strategies and eventually developed skills based on their mistakes. However, there were many participants who were able to observe and emulate their peers’ learning skills, but failed to utilize these skills independently in other contexts. These behaviors were observed more among the lower proficiency learners. It was also shown that the students who utilized effective SRL skills were good at managing their language studies. Several factors affected their SRL skill development. Emerging demands due to novel academic assignments, new living environments, and additional social obligations proved particularly challenging. Students with less developed self-regulated skills found themselves in a riskier position because in many cases it was difficult for them to understand the demands that new tasks presented. Consequently, they tended to take on more tasks beyond their abilities. The cases of two participants who visited the advisor repeatedly suggested that giving advice only on language learning strategies was insufficient, and pointed to the need for more SRL training. The rich description of the multiple cases in this study contributes to our understanding of the many challenges that students face in their transition to college, and the various strategies, some successful and some less so, that they use in their attempts to address these challenges. This study also provides insight into the processes of SRL development in the Japanese context. In particular, this study elucidates the difficulties that lower proficiency students have in adjusting to college life and developing SRL skills. The importance of understanding the context is re-emphasized and more flexibility on the part of advisors is recommended in order to support the varying degrees of preparedness for self-regulated learning with which first year students come to college.
dc.format.extent394 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectLanguage
dc.subjectCase Study
dc.subjectEnglish as A Foreign Language
dc.subjectFirst-year Experience
dc.subjectSelf-regulated Learning
dc.subjectTransition to College
dc.titleJapanese students' development of self-regulated learning during the transition to college
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberBeglar, David J.
dc.contributor.committeememberKikuchi, Keita
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Ron R.
dc.description.departmentTeaching & Learning
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3033
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:09:41Z


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