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dc.contributor.advisorWayland, Bradford B.
dc.creatorImler, Gregory H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:09:41Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:09:41Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other914186266
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3049
dc.description.abstractThe unifying objective of this work is the study of model systems that will assist in the development of new metal catalysts capable of converting carbon monoxide and hydrogen (syngas) into organic oxygenates at mild temperature and pressure. The selective catalytic transformation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to liquid fuels and chemical feedstocks represents a major "Grand Challenge" of catalysis science. A core objective is the study of a macrocycle that is related to a porphyrin ligand in order to circumvent some of the disadvantages of utilizing porphyrins in catalysis. The rhodium complex of the macrocycle dibenzotetramethylaza[14]annulene ([(tmtaa)Rh]2]) was reacted with a series of small molecules relevant to CO reduction and hydrogenation. Several complexes were formed that demonstrated the ability to partially reduce and hydrogenate carbon monoxide, including the dirhodium ketone (Rh-C(O)-Rh) and an example of a thermodynamically favorable metal formyl complex ((tmtaa)Rh-C(O)H). An important feature of this work is the measurement of thermodynamic data to provide experimental benchmarks for obtaining key species in CO reduction and hydrogenation. A thorough study of the (tmtaa)Rh system will help in identifying structural features that assist or hinder CO hydrogenation. All reactions are monitored by 1H NMR which permits determination of solution thermodynamics from equilibrium constants obtained by NMR peak integrations. DFT calculations have supplemented experimental results by providing estimates to compare with the experimentally determined thermodynamic data. These computations also provide insight into the structures and thermodynamics of species that cannot be observed directly such as short lived intermediates and thermodynamically unfavorable products. Heterobimetallic complexes of (tmtaa)Rh* with a second metal radical have been utilized to attempt to convert CO to organic products. Reactivity with CO and H2 has been accomplished, with most of these metal systems providing (tmtaa)Rh-C(O)H and M-H as final products. These systems are now ideally set up for catalysis in which M-H can deliver hydrogen to reduce and hydrogenate the rhodium formyl unit. Performing these reactions at high pressures of CO/H2 or with a more sterically hindered analog of tmtaa may provide the conditions necessary for catalysis. Reactivity, thermodynamic and computational studies have been used to analyze and compare bond energies in this current work with previous studies accomplished in the Wayland group. These comparisons permit further understanding into the factors that control bond strength, guiding future studies and allowing tuning of bond strengths based on choice of conditions for a catalytic process. This research has resulted in a more complete understanding of the factors that control the favorability of various intermediates in CO reduction and hydrogenation and the application of these results can be used to guide the next generation of metal ligand systems that will yield organic oxygenates at mild conditions.
dc.format.extent262 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectInorganic Chemistry
dc.titleReactivity, Characterization, Equilibrium Thermodynamics and Hetero-bimetallic Studies of Tridentate and Tetradentate Complexes Relevant to Syngas Catalysis
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberZdilla, Michael J., 1978-
dc.contributor.committeememberValentine, Ann M.
dc.contributor.committeememberCannon, Kevin C.
dc.description.departmentChemistry
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3031
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:09:41Z


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