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dc.contributor.advisorZohn, Steven David, 1966-
dc.creatorHull, Gretchen Lindsay
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T16:09:39Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T16:09:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3039
dc.description.abstractThough many philosophers and music theorists have admitted the signification of the sublime in music as a possibility, the nature and mechanism of that signification has not yet been treated at length with a methodology familiar to musicians or native to music theory. Within this dissertation I have conducted a survey of the philosophy of the sublime as understood by Edmund Burke (1729 – 1797), Immanuel Kant (1724 – 1804), Friedrich Schiller (1759 – 1805), and Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 – 1860), with references to other contemporary philosophers and writers. The broader influence of the sublime in regards to German-speaking regions and certain musical composers was also considered. I then gathered from the above philosophers’ categories and definitions of the sublime a constellation of objects, qualities, and emotional states associated with the sublime. These functioned as signs or signifiers of the sublime, whose paths of signification were considered or determined with use of semiotics and topic theory, with reference to the work of Danuta Mirka, Raymond Monelle, and Leonard Ratner. Making reference to score examples listed in the list of figures, I implemented these techniques in analyses of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Sonata No. 30 in E Major, Op. 109 and Sonata No. 32 in C, Op. 111 as well as Franz Liszt’s “Mazeppa,” from the Études d’exécution transcendante, “Funerailles” from Harmonies Poétiques et Religieuses III, S. 173, and “Marche funèbre, En mémoire de Maximilian I, Empereur du Mexique” in from Années de pèlerinage III, S.163.
dc.format.extent138 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPerforming Arts
dc.subjectMusic Theory
dc.subjectBeethoven
dc.subjectLiszt
dc.subjectPiano
dc.subjectSemiotics
dc.subjectSublime
dc.subjectTopic Theory
dc.titleHearing the Sublime: Signification of the Sublime in Solo Piano Literature of the Nineteenth Century
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberKlein, Michael Leslie
dc.contributor.committeememberAbramovic, Charles
dc.contributor.committeememberLatham, Edward David
dc.description.departmentMusic Performance
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3021
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeD.M.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T16:09:39Z


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