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dc.contributor.advisorPavlou, Paul A.
dc.creatorHong, Yili
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T15:20:06Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T15:20:06Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other890207834
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/3020
dc.description.abstractUbiquitous access to the Internet and supporting technologies gave birth to online labor markets (Malone and Laubacher 1998). Online labor markets enable employers (employers) to contract with professionals (service providers) from anywhere in the world. Firms now are able to greatly expand their workforce and bring a large arsenal of labor to bear on IT jobs, such as software or web development using Internet-enabled procurement platforms such as Freelancer. These markets serve as intermediaries for IT services (outsourcers post Call for Bids (CFBs) for services and providers offer bids for IT services) that help match employers with service providers across the globe. In my dissertation, I try to comprehensively study this Internet-enabled phenomenon from the perspectives of these three entities on global online markets with three separate yet related essays. The first essay focuses on the "global" nature of the market, and assess the effect of global frictions and global labor arbitrage on both provider bidding and employer selection. The second essay focuses on the effect of auction mechanism - sealed versus open bid auction - on providers' bidding dynamics, and the market performance. The third essay focuses on estimating true consumer (employer) surplus of online labor markets with a quality-adjusted measure. I also test its robustness by comparing its effects on consumers' subsequent transactions. I also find that market immaturity, consumers' lack of experience in the market, and consumers' lack of familiarity with IT service providers lead to the difference between the traditional measure and the quality-adjusted consumer surplus.
dc.format.extent171 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEconomics, Commerce-business
dc.subjectEconomics, Labor
dc.subjectInformation Technology
dc.subjectAuction Format
dc.subjectConsumer Surplus
dc.subjectEconometric Analyses
dc.subjectGlobal Frictions
dc.subjectOnline Labor Markets
dc.titleTHREE ESSAYS ON ONLINE LABOR MARKETS FOR IT SERVICES
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberChen, Pei-yu
dc.contributor.committeememberHitt, Lorin M. (Lorin Moultrie)
dc.contributor.committeememberWattal, Sunil
dc.contributor.committeememberSarkar, S. K. (Sanat K.)
dc.description.departmentBusiness Administration/Management Information Systems
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/3002
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T15:20:06Z


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