• Exploring the Faculty Blogoverse: Where to Start and What’s in it for Academic Librarians

      Murray, David; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2007-10)
      A successful strategic keeping-up regimen requires more than a steady diet of content from within one's own profession. Murray and Bell identify resources for locating faculty blogs, identify some well-regarded faculty blogs worthy of review, and discuss how faculty blogs can benefit academic librarians and why they should be reading them as part of their regular keeping routine.
    • Fit Libraries are Future Proof

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-10)
      Fitness is a condition that allows someone to persist, avoid serious health problems, and live longer. If fitness is lacking, decline and decay may ensue. In the case of libraries, fitness translates to increased longevity and less chances of failure that lead to irrelevance. In contrast to fitness in individuals, fitness in libraries is an ambiguous concept. One may point to the numbers, such as an increase in circulation or the delivery of more instruction sessions, as signs of a fit library. However, fitness is achieved by means of a combination of strategies involving discipline, commitment to change, consistent behaviors, and having fun. This article looks at several strategies that libraries can adopt to make themselves fitter and future-proofed. Adapted from the source document.
    • From Gatekeepers to Gate Openers: Designing Meaningful Library Experiences

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2009-08)
      As gatekeepers and content buyers, academic librarians carve out only a limited higher education role - making information accessible - for themselves. Our future depends on our ability to differentiate what libraries offer and what library workers bring to their communities. This article lays out an alternate vision for the library profession - as gate-keeper - where the focus is on designing great library experiences and building relationships with community members.
    • Getting Organized for Action: Governance Structure Models for Statewide OER Projects

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2020)
      When academic librarians began to address the high cost of textbooks a decade ago, they typically created textbook affordability programs tailored to the needs of their own institutions. Acting independently allowed for fast implementation and progress, but the downside of going it alone is the potential lack of sustainability. While colleges and universities continue to develop local programs, the predominant trend more recently is the statewide open educational resources initiative. This article reports the findings of a survey of these state initiatives to learn more about their governance structures, as no one model has emerged. This information can benefit existing and future statewide initiatives to optimally structure their governance model for productivity, inclusiveness, and sustainability.
    • Goodbye, Paley… Hello, Charles!: Marketing a Library Move

      Wilson, Sara Curnow (2019-08-25)
      How do you prepare a campus for the closure of one main library and the opening of a brand-new building? Temple University Libraries faced this question in 2019. Their marketing team answered the call by creating a campaign that honored their original Paley Library while building excitement for the new Charles Library. As part of this campaign, library staff worked together to create their own “Mean Tweets” video, reading real tweets patrons had posted about Paley over the years. In this column, the team's director reflects on the process and how it changed the tone of their overall campaign.
    • Integrating an Information Literacy Quiz into the Learning Management System

      Lowe, M. Sara; Booth, Char; Tagge , Natalie; Stone, Sean M.; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2014)
      The Claremont Colleges Library Instruction Services Department developed a Quiz that could be integrated into the consortial learning management software to accompany a local online, open-source IL tutorial. The Quiz is integrated into individual course pages, allowing students to receive a grade for completion and improving buy-in at the faculty and student level. Piloted in nine first-year classes in Fall 2012 then revised and launched in Spring 2013, the Quiz has given the Library valuable assessment data on first-year student IL skills and enhanced the ability of teaching librarians to tailor their instruction to student performance.
    • Is More Always Better?: When quality is the goal, access to everything may not be the user's best bet

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2003-01)
      Bell discusses the difficulty in searching for research information among online full-text journals. He discusses ways that librarians can reintroduce the concept that quality research and information retrieval can precede the acquisition of content.
    • It's All About the Experience: UX for Academic Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2015-09)
    • It’s Up to the Librarians: Establishing A Statewide OER Initiative

      Bell, Steven; Salem, Joseph A., Jr.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-10-31)
      Academic librarians increasingly adopt roles as campus leaders to promote the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) and other strategies to encourage making textbook affordability for students an institutional priority. When it comes to a statewide strategy to support academic library efforts for textbook affordability, Pennsylvania is lagging more progressive states such as Oregon, Georgia, Ohio, Virginia and Louisiana. This article makes a case for and lays out a strategy by which Pennsylvania’s academic librarians can develop a statewide initiative to tackle the challenge of textbook affordability together in order to achieve substantial progress.
    • Learning From Crucible Moments to Become Better Crisis Leaders

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-11)
      If you lead, you will face a crisis. Of all the demands made on leaders, crisis leadership is probably the most challenging, and it is the one they are least prepared to handle properly due to lack of experience and skills. While thinking ahead about how to respond in a crisis can help, it really comes down to whether each leader’s personal experience has equipped them with the right level of fortitude and courage to take an organization through such an event, especially given the highly unpredictable nature of crises. The central premise presented in this article is that each leader can gain valuable experience and learn from his or her own crucible moments, and that this will in turn help them become more confident crisis leaders.
    • Learning from Crucible Moments: Lessons in Crisis Leadership

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2019-02)
      Access to formal and informal leadership education and mentoring all contribute to the development of library leaders. Though crisis leadership may be discussed in leadership training, it is often the case that experiencing and leading through crises is the primary way in which most library leaders gain skill in managing these challenging situations. If we learn through our mistakes, then crisis leadership is surely a shining example of this principle for leaders are most apt to falter when finding themselves in the crucible. This article presents the crisis situation in which leaders are subjected to the changes forged in the crucible, as an opportunity for leaders to learn, gain wisdom and grow professionally, even when their performance may falter. It also presents the dark times crisis as a newer type of situation leaders will increasingly confront and for which they will find it difficult to adequately prepare. Different crisis scenarios are presented along with recommendations for how leaders can best manage and learn from them.
    • Linking the Library To Courseware: A Strategic Alliance to Improve Learning Outcomes

      Bell, Steven; Shank, John D.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2004-11)
    • Mastering Moderation

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-06)
      If what you do is emulate what you've seen most moderators do at library conferences, both physical and virtual, chances are you'll politely ask attendees to take their seats before you start reading off the presenters' names and their canned biographical statements. Here are some of the primary responsibilities the moderator should agree to accept: * Develop a timeline for preparation leading up to the program * Create a script or timeline that gives structure to the presentation * Bring presenters together for program planning * Identify strategies to engage the audience * Keep the speakers on time and the attendees invo ved * Orchestrate the program with flexibility * Wrap up the proceedings with authority Designing the program When attendees experience a great program, it's usually the result of intentional design. [...] each moderator should decide what works best for each individual program, the speakers, and the audience.
    • Mental health solutions for domestic violence victims amid COVID-19: a review of the literature

      Su, Zhaohui; McDonnell, Dean; Roth, Stephanie; Li, Quanlei; Segalo, Sabina; Shi, Feng; Wagers, Shelly; Roth|0000-0001-5415-1718 (2021-06-28)
      Background: Due to COVID-19, domestic violence victims face a range of mental health challenges, possibly resulting in substantial human and economic consequences. However, there is a lack of mental health interventions tailored to domestic violence victims and in the context of COVID-19. In this study, we aim to identify interventions that can improve domestic violence victims’ mental health amid the COVID-19 pandemic to address the research gap. Main text: Drawing insights from established COVID-19 review frameworks and a comprehensive review of PubMed literature, we obtained information on interventions that can address domestic violence victims’ mental health challenges amid COVID-19. We identified practical and timely solutions that can be utilized to address mental health challenges domestic violence victims face amid COVID-19, mainly focusing on (1) decreasing victims’ exposure to the abuser and (2) increasing victims’ access to mental health services. Conclusion: Domestic violence is a public health crisis that affects all demographics and could result in significant morbidity and mortality. In addition to emphasizing mental health challenges faced by domestic violence victims, multidisciplinary interventions are identified that could provide timely and practical solutions to domestic violence victims amid the pandemic, which range from tailored shelter home strategies, education programs, escape plans, laws and regulations, as well as more technology-based mental health solutions. There is a significant need for more multipronged and multidisciplinary strategies to address domestic violence amid and beyond the pandemic, particularly interventions that could capitalize on the ubiquity and cost-effectiveness of technology-based solutions.
    • New Information Marketplace Competitors: Issues and Strategies for Academic Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2002-04)
      Administrative portals, e-braries, and other commercial information providers are challenging the academic library's traditional monopoly as the campus information gateway. Are these new information marketplace competitors a threat or an opportunity for academic libraries? Might they draw away the library's user base or can they be harnessed to provide access to more and better digital collections? This article examines the impact of these new competitors, presents results from a survey of library directors about their responses to information competition, and discusses strategies library directors can use to maintain the library's status as the user's first choice of information provider.