• Learning From Crucible Moments to Become Better Crisis Leaders

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-11)
      If you lead, you will face a crisis. Of all the demands made on leaders, crisis leadership is probably the most challenging, and it is the one they are least prepared to handle properly due to lack of experience and skills. While thinking ahead about how to respond in a crisis can help, it really comes down to whether each leader’s personal experience has equipped them with the right level of fortitude and courage to take an organization through such an event, especially given the highly unpredictable nature of crises. The central premise presented in this article is that each leader can gain valuable experience and learn from his or her own crucible moments, and that this will in turn help them become more confident crisis leaders.
    • Learning from Crucible Moments: Lessons in Crisis Leadership

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2019-02)
      Access to formal and informal leadership education and mentoring all contribute to the development of library leaders. Though crisis leadership may be discussed in leadership training, it is often the case that experiencing and leading through crises is the primary way in which most library leaders gain skill in managing these challenging situations. If we learn through our mistakes, then crisis leadership is surely a shining example of this principle for leaders are most apt to falter when finding themselves in the crucible. This article presents the crisis situation in which leaders are subjected to the changes forged in the crucible, as an opportunity for leaders to learn, gain wisdom and grow professionally, even when their performance may falter. It also presents the dark times crisis as a newer type of situation leaders will increasingly confront and for which they will find it difficult to adequately prepare. Different crisis scenarios are presented along with recommendations for how leaders can best manage and learn from them.
    • Leveraging accreditation to integrate sustainable information literacy instruction into the medical school curriculum

      Tagge , Natalie; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2018-07-02)
      Background: While the term “information literacy” is not often used, the skills associated with that concept are now central to the mission and accreditation process of medical schools. The simultaneous emphasis on critical thinking skills, knowledge acquisition, active learning, and development and acceptance of technology perfectly positions libraries to be central to and integrated into the curriculum. Case Presentation: This case study discusses how one medical school and health sciences library leveraged accreditation to develop a sustainable and efficient flipped classroom model for teaching information literacy skills to first-year medical students. The model provides first-year medical students with the opportunity to learn information literacy skills, critical thinking skills, and teamwork, and then practice these skills throughout the pre-clerkship years. Conclusions: The curriculum was deemed a success and will be included in next year’s first-year curriculum. Faculty have reported substantial improvements in the information sources that first-year medical students are using in subsequent clinical reasoning conferences and in other parts of the curriculum. The effectiveness of the curriculum model was assessed using a rubric.
    • Librarians Do It Differently: Comparative Usability Testing of Students and Library Staff

      Turner, Nancy B. (2011)
      Our experience as librarians suggests that library staff search and locate library resources differently than college students. We bring to our work knowledge about library collections and search tool functionality that may inform our strategies for finding library resources. Through our training and experience, we have developed more accurate mental models for the information universe for which our library website is a portal. The purpose of this research is to explore that hypothesis and if it has merit, to articulate those differences in information seeking behaviors, particularly search strategy and tool use. As those patterns of difference are identified, the findings may be used to improve the usability of the website for students as well as illuminate real student behaviors for library staff. In general, library staff used different strategies, selected different tools and used facets and search limits in ways that were different than students carrying out the same tasks. Their “preknowledge” about library collections and differences in how search tools function informed their search strategies. Students were more interested in efficiency and assumed a “Googlelike” search functionality when presented with a search box.
    • Librarians Flip Out: Leveraging librarian's skills to teach self-directed learning competencies

      Tagge , Natalie; Pierce, Jenny; 0000-0001-6200-8217; 0000-0002-1045-0027 (2018-02)
    • Linking the Library To Courseware: A Strategic Alliance to Improve Learning Outcomes

      Bell, Steven; Shank, John D.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2004-11)
    • Mastering Moderation

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-06)
      If what you do is emulate what you've seen most moderators do at library conferences, both physical and virtual, chances are you'll politely ask attendees to take their seats before you start reading off the presenters' names and their canned biographical statements. Here are some of the primary responsibilities the moderator should agree to accept: * Develop a timeline for preparation leading up to the program * Create a script or timeline that gives structure to the presentation * Bring presenters together for program planning * Identify strategies to engage the audience * Keep the speakers on time and the attendees invo ved * Orchestrate the program with flexibility * Wrap up the proceedings with authority Designing the program When attendees experience a great program, it's usually the result of intentional design. [...] each moderator should decide what works best for each individual program, the speakers, and the audience.
    • Metadata Requirements for 3D Data

      Blundell, Jon; Clark, Jasmine L.; DeVet, Katherine E.; Hardesty, Juliet L. (2020)
      The “Metadata Requirements for 3D Data” chapter provides recommendations for metadatai based on the five-stage digital asset lifecycleii. The “Create” section covers some of the principal ways 3D models are created and discusses what metadata can be captured during the creation process. This section looks at not only what metadata could be captured during model creation, but also why capturing that information is important. The “Manage” section covers the metadata needs for organizing, verifying, and providing accessiii to 3D data. Recommendations include grouping files together as much as possible (by 3D object, by collection of objects, and by project) in order to apply organizational metadata that can be used for access and reuse purposes. The Distribution and Publication section discusses the need for a variety of distribution platforms that support the broadly varying metadata needs of different disciplines. Examples include the need for more granular metadata to support reproducibility and privacy in certain fields, as well as concerns around metadata requirements for accessibility for disability more broadly. Though the circulation and access norms for 3D data are still evolving, the Access and Reuse section posits key metadata anticipated to be useful in the discoveryiv and access of 3D data and models for research or reuse. The “Archive” section utilizes PREMIS as a basis for its recommendations. The rapid changes in the tools and platforms that support the creation and utilization of 3D data results in heavier emphasis on metadata that provides context to data that is often no longer supported by the latest technologies. Additional portions of PREMIS that may be of interest to readers are also specified. The chapter ends with an overall table of recommended metadata fields along with future work needed, naming annotation metadata and metadata for accessibility needs as top priorities for standardization and best practice recommendations.
    • Moving Forward: Unveiling Our New Strategic Plan

      Cosby, Michelle; 0000-0002-5087-094X (2019)
    • New Information Marketplace Competitors: Issues and Strategies for Academic Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2002-04)
      Administrative portals, e-braries, and other commercial information providers are challenging the academic library's traditional monopoly as the campus information gateway. Are these new information marketplace competitors a threat or an opportunity for academic libraries? Might they draw away the library's user base or can they be harnessed to provide access to more and better digital collections? This article examines the impact of these new competitors, presents results from a survey of library directors about their responses to information competition, and discusses strategies library directors can use to maintain the library's status as the user's first choice of information provider.
    • New Roles for the Road Ahead: Essays Commissioned for ACRL's 75th Anniversary

      Bell, Steven; Dempsey, Lorcan; Fister, Barbara; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2015)
    • Patterns of Culture: Re-aligning Library Culture with User Needs

      Turner, Nancy B. (2009)
      Radical changes in technology and information access have given rise to new academic disciplinary connections, new research and teaching practices, and new modes of communication. With the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Syracuse University Library has undertaken a research project to better understand these changes at the University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. We intend to develop an indepth understanding of one multi-disciplinary academic culture and then to examine the library’s culture and work practices to discover where services and resources are meeting needs and where they are not. The qualitative methods used in the Patterns of Culture project is informed by the ethnographic work conducted at the University of Rochester. The research team, four librarians and a graduate assistant, received training in interview and observational techniques from anthropologist Nancy Foster. Our data gathering, conducted from spring 2007 to spring 2008, involved interviews with faculty, librarians, and students about their work practice, eliciting photographic diaries from students and conducting observations in classrooms and public spaces. The goal of the Patterns of Culture (after Ruth Benedict’s landmark work) is threefold: to gain a better understanding of the needs, research, and work practices of the faculty and students and to gain the same type of understanding of library staff; to develop a plan to align library culture, resources, and services more closely with the needs of faculty and students; and to produce a model for data gathering and analysis that can be applied by the library to other academic settings. Our project is unusual in that it applies the same ethnographic methods to three groups, using comparison as a means for deeper understanding.
    • Reaching Them Where They Are: Put the Library Where Students are Learning with LMS Integration

      Given Castello, Olivia; DeSarno, Nicole; 0000-0002-2721-9809 (2020-01-06)
    • Rediscovering an Old Genre: Open Textbook Publishing and University Presses

      Johnson, Ann (2020)
      Most discussions about university presses focus on presses as monograph publishers. This article examines university presses as textbook publishers, and argues that presses could potentially play an important role in supporting the proliferation of open textbooks. I begin by tracing the long history of university presses’ involvement in textbook publishing, and more recently, presses’ involvement in open textbook publishing. I describe the different types of presses that are interested in open textbook publishing, and then attempt to classify the open textbooks that are currently being published by university presses.
    • Responding to a new generation of proprietary study resources in medical education

      O'Hanlon, Robin; Laynor, Gregory; 0000-0002-4578-4051 (2019-04-01)
      Traditionally, health sciences libraries have supported patrons who are preparing for medical licensure examinations by collecting and making accessible board exam preparation resources, such as question banks and study guides. However, when online board exam preparation resources are not available for licensing, providing equitable access to all library users can be a challenge. In recent years, a new generation of online study resources has emerged. Sites such as SketchyMedical and Picmonic use visual learning mnemonics, while resources such as Quizlet leverage crowd-sourcing to generate study content. While some of the content from these resources is made freely available, these resources are often limited to paid individual subscribers. This new generation of study resources, thus, presents a conundrum for health sciences librarians. On the one hand, these innovative resources offer new insights into how students learn and study, reflecting pedagogical trends in self-directed learning. On the other hand, the proprietary individual subscription–based model of these resources can widen the achievement gap between students who can afford to pay subscription costs and those who cannot. This commentary provides an overview of some of the most popular medical board examination preparation resources that have emerged in recent years. The authors suggest that health sciences librarians collaborate with medical students and educators to better understand and evaluate these resources.