• Gen Con Programs

      Scales, Gary; Jewell, Kaelin; Sarkar, Ritomaitree; Huang, Luling; Shoemaker, Matt (2020)
      This dataset contains spreadsheets detailing all events held at the Gen Con gaming convention from 1968 to 2017.
    • Getting Organized for Action: Governance Structure Models for Statewide OER Projects

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2020)
      When academic librarians began to address the high cost of textbooks a decade ago, they typically created textbook affordability programs tailored to the needs of their own institutions. Acting independently allowed for fast implementation and progress, but the downside of going it alone is the potential lack of sustainability. While colleges and universities continue to develop local programs, the predominant trend more recently is the statewide open educational resources initiative. This article reports the findings of a survey of these state initiatives to learn more about their governance structures, as no one model has emerged. This information can benefit existing and future statewide initiatives to optimally structure their governance model for productivity, inclusiveness, and sustainability.
    • Good Leaders Never Stop Learning

      Cosby, Michelle; 0000-0002-5087-094X (2020)
    • Integrating an Information Literacy Quiz into the Learning Management System

      Lowe, M. Sara; Booth, Char; Tagge , Natalie; Stone, Sean M.; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2014)
      The Claremont Colleges Library Instruction Services Department developed a Quiz that could be integrated into the consortial learning management software to accompany a local online, open-source IL tutorial. The Quiz is integrated into individual course pages, allowing students to receive a grade for completion and improving buy-in at the faculty and student level. Piloted in nine first-year classes in Fall 2012 then revised and launched in Spring 2013, the Quiz has given the Library valuable assessment data on first-year student IL skills and enhanced the ability of teaching librarians to tailor their instruction to student performance.
    • Introduction to Concept Mapping Project

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-09)
    • Is More Always Better?: When quality is the goal, access to everything may not be the user's best bet

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2003-01)
      Bell discusses the difficulty in searching for research information among online full-text journals. He discusses ways that librarians can reintroduce the concept that quality research and information retrieval can precede the acquisition of content.
    • It's All About the Experience: UX for Academic Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2015-09)
    • It’s Up to the Librarians: Establishing A Statewide OER Initiative

      Bell, Steven; Salem, Joseph A., Jr.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-10-31)
      Academic librarians increasingly adopt roles as campus leaders to promote the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) and other strategies to encourage making textbook affordability for students an institutional priority. When it comes to a statewide strategy to support academic library efforts for textbook affordability, Pennsylvania is lagging more progressive states such as Oregon, Georgia, Ohio, Virginia and Louisiana. This article makes a case for and lays out a strategy by which Pennsylvania’s academic librarians can develop a statewide initiative to tackle the challenge of textbook affordability together in order to achieve substantial progress.
    • Learning From Crucible Moments to Become Better Crisis Leaders

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-11)
      If you lead, you will face a crisis. Of all the demands made on leaders, crisis leadership is probably the most challenging, and it is the one they are least prepared to handle properly due to lack of experience and skills. While thinking ahead about how to respond in a crisis can help, it really comes down to whether each leader’s personal experience has equipped them with the right level of fortitude and courage to take an organization through such an event, especially given the highly unpredictable nature of crises. The central premise presented in this article is that each leader can gain valuable experience and learn from his or her own crucible moments, and that this will in turn help them become more confident crisis leaders.
    • Learning from Crucible Moments: Lessons in Crisis Leadership

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2019-02)
      Access to formal and informal leadership education and mentoring all contribute to the development of library leaders. Though crisis leadership may be discussed in leadership training, it is often the case that experiencing and leading through crises is the primary way in which most library leaders gain skill in managing these challenging situations. If we learn through our mistakes, then crisis leadership is surely a shining example of this principle for leaders are most apt to falter when finding themselves in the crucible. This article presents the crisis situation in which leaders are subjected to the changes forged in the crucible, as an opportunity for leaders to learn, gain wisdom and grow professionally, even when their performance may falter. It also presents the dark times crisis as a newer type of situation leaders will increasingly confront and for which they will find it difficult to adequately prepare. Different crisis scenarios are presented along with recommendations for how leaders can best manage and learn from them.
    • Leveraging accreditation to integrate sustainable information literacy instruction into the medical school curriculum

      Tagge , Natalie; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2018-07-02)
      Background: While the term “information literacy” is not often used, the skills associated with that concept are now central to the mission and accreditation process of medical schools. The simultaneous emphasis on critical thinking skills, knowledge acquisition, active learning, and development and acceptance of technology perfectly positions libraries to be central to and integrated into the curriculum. Case Presentation: This case study discusses how one medical school and health sciences library leveraged accreditation to develop a sustainable and efficient flipped classroom model for teaching information literacy skills to first-year medical students. The model provides first-year medical students with the opportunity to learn information literacy skills, critical thinking skills, and teamwork, and then practice these skills throughout the pre-clerkship years. Conclusions: The curriculum was deemed a success and will be included in next year’s first-year curriculum. Faculty have reported substantial improvements in the information sources that first-year medical students are using in subsequent clinical reasoning conferences and in other parts of the curriculum. The effectiveness of the curriculum model was assessed using a rubric.
    • Librarians Do It Differently: Comparative Usability Testing of Students and Library Staff

      Turner, Nancy B. (2011)
      Our experience as librarians suggests that library staff search and locate library resources differently than college students. We bring to our work knowledge about library collections and search tool functionality that may inform our strategies for finding library resources. Through our training and experience, we have developed more accurate mental models for the information universe for which our library website is a portal. The purpose of this research is to explore that hypothesis and if it has merit, to articulate those differences in information seeking behaviors, particularly search strategy and tool use. As those patterns of difference are identified, the findings may be used to improve the usability of the website for students as well as illuminate real student behaviors for library staff. In general, library staff used different strategies, selected different tools and used facets and search limits in ways that were different than students carrying out the same tasks. Their “preknowledge” about library collections and differences in how search tools function informed their search strategies. Students were more interested in efficiency and assumed a “Googlelike” search functionality when presented with a search box.
    • Librarians Flip Out: Leveraging librarian's skills to teach self-directed learning competencies

      Tagge , Natalie; Pierce, Jenny; 0000-0001-6200-8217; 0000-0002-1045-0027 (2018-02)
    • Linking the Library To Courseware: A Strategic Alliance to Improve Learning Outcomes

      Bell, Steven; Shank, John D.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2004-11)
    • Mastering Moderation

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-06)
      If what you do is emulate what you've seen most moderators do at library conferences, both physical and virtual, chances are you'll politely ask attendees to take their seats before you start reading off the presenters' names and their canned biographical statements. Here are some of the primary responsibilities the moderator should agree to accept: * Develop a timeline for preparation leading up to the program * Create a script or timeline that gives structure to the presentation * Bring presenters together for program planning * Identify strategies to engage the audience * Keep the speakers on time and the attendees invo ved * Orchestrate the program with flexibility * Wrap up the proceedings with authority Designing the program When attendees experience a great program, it's usually the result of intentional design. [...] each moderator should decide what works best for each individual program, the speakers, and the audience.
    • Metadata Requirements for 3D Data

      Blundell, Jon; Clark, Jasmine L.; DeVet, Katherine E.; Hardesty, Juliet L. (2020)
      The “Metadata Requirements for 3D Data” chapter provides recommendations for metadatai based on the five-stage digital asset lifecycleii. The “Create” section covers some of the principal ways 3D models are created and discusses what metadata can be captured during the creation process. This section looks at not only what metadata could be captured during model creation, but also why capturing that information is important. The “Manage” section covers the metadata needs for organizing, verifying, and providing accessiii to 3D data. Recommendations include grouping files together as much as possible (by 3D object, by collection of objects, and by project) in order to apply organizational metadata that can be used for access and reuse purposes. The Distribution and Publication section discusses the need for a variety of distribution platforms that support the broadly varying metadata needs of different disciplines. Examples include the need for more granular metadata to support reproducibility and privacy in certain fields, as well as concerns around metadata requirements for accessibility for disability more broadly. Though the circulation and access norms for 3D data are still evolving, the Access and Reuse section posits key metadata anticipated to be useful in the discoveryiv and access of 3D data and models for research or reuse. The “Archive” section utilizes PREMIS as a basis for its recommendations. The rapid changes in the tools and platforms that support the creation and utilization of 3D data results in heavier emphasis on metadata that provides context to data that is often no longer supported by the latest technologies. Additional portions of PREMIS that may be of interest to readers are also specified. The chapter ends with an overall table of recommended metadata fields along with future work needed, naming annotation metadata and metadata for accessibility needs as top priorities for standardization and best practice recommendations.