• Collections Are For Collisions: Designing It Into the Experience

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2014-09)
      Who among us has never known, however trivial, a serendipitous discovery. More essentially, nearly every librarian has heard at some point in his or her career someone's story about a serendipitous encounter with a book. As a profession we are likely in agreement that serendipitous discovery in the library stacks is a good thing. Think of it as collision with our collections. As our collections become more digital and less tangible, as we move them off the stacks and into onsite or remote storage, and as students spend more time touching keyboards and less time connecting with texts, how likely is it that future patrons will have such experiences. What's odd about the impending decline of this type of engagement is that in other industrial sectors, the very act of serendipity is being engineered into the workflow. Librarians, on the other hand, appear to be excising serendipity out of the library experience. If we believe there is value in the act of serendipity, then it is our responsibility to design the library experience to save it. Adapted from the source document.
    • Coming in the Back Door: Leveraging Open Textbooks to Promote Scholarly Communications on Campus

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2012-05-15)
      Textbook affordability is a critical issue in higher education. Academic librarians have responded by creating programs to encourage faculty to become aware of the cost of textbooks and using open educational resources as an alternative. Another, less obvious reason to start a campus textbook affordability initiative is to establish a culture of openness for all types of open material. Faculty are often much more willing to confront textbook costs than they are costly, pay-walled journals. The author describes how he instituted a project to create more awareness of open content on his campus.
    • Constructive destruction: Examining the life cycle of texts through RE:BOOK

      Tagge , Natalie; Booth, Char; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2013-09)
    • Cornucopia of Library Technology: What to Choose and Use

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2005-11)
    • Degrees of Impact: Analyzing the Effects of Progressive Librarian Course Collaborations on Student Performance

      Booth, Char; Lowe, M. Sara; Tagge , Natalie; Stone, Sean M.; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2015-07)
      The Claremont Colleges Library conducted direct rubric assessment of Pitzer College First-Year Seminar research papers to analyze the impact of diverse levels of librarian course collaborations on information literacy (IL) performance in student writing. Findings indicate that progressive degrees of librarian engagement in IL-related course instruction and/or syllabus and assignment design had an increasingly positive impact on student performance. A secondary indirect analysis of librarian teaching evaluations and self-perceived learning gains by students and faculty showed no correlation to rubric IL scores, suggesting the importance of “authentic” assessment in determining actual learning outcomes. This mixed-methods study presents findings in each area and examines their implications for effective IL course collaborations.
    • Design Thinking

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2008-01)
      Design thinking can offer a new way of thinking about, acting on, and implementing our resources and services with a more thoughtful and creative approach that is focused on the design of the best possible library user experience. @ your library My first encounter with the application of design thinking in a library setting was the Maya Design firm's renovation and remodeling of the main branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. [...] librarians can still make use of design thinking in reengineering how users navigate the library and its electronic resources.\n Books and articles by and about design thinkers, such as the The Art of Innovation, can provide greater detail and more concrete examples of how design thinking is applied to the creation of products and services. The Blended Librarians Online Learning Community at blendedlibrarian .org is a free community open to all that is justbeginningto explore ways in which design thinking can be applied to further collab oration with community partners and help students achieve academic success.
    • Design Thinking + User Experience = Better-Designed Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-07)
      This article provides an overview of design thinking as a component of, and contributor to, great library user experiences. When design thinking is used to shape the environment in which users connect with library spaces and personnel, the result is a better library experience—by design.
    • Digital scholarship as a learning center in the library: Building relationships and educational initiatives

      Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-03)
      Hensley and Bell discuss digital scholarship as a learning center in the library. The technology in digital scholarship centers such as Arduino kits, laser cutters, virtual reality headsets, high-end scanners, visualization and video walls, and specialized software, provide an opportunity to build on the expertise of librarians, who are knowledgeable and passionate about sharing technology's connection to research but also willing to learn along with faculty and students as they explore possibilities presented by new models of digital scholarship. Since centers cannot wholly take on the responsibility of digital scholarship education, they must be willing to construct a network of collaborators across campus who have similar interests in leveraging new technologies and research methods to advance scholarship and learning at their institutions.
    • Easy Steps to Building a Systematic Review Service: A Course for All Health Sciences Librarians

      Tagge , Natalie; Pierce, Jenny; Roth, Stephanie; 0000-0001-5415-1718; 0000-0001-6200-8217; 0000-0002-1045-0027 (2019-05)
    • Empathy-based VR: Harnessing emotion for learning

      Given Castello, Olivia; Hample, Jordan; Lyons, Patrick; 0000-0002-2721-9809 (2021-01-06)
      Temple Libraries’ Virtual Reality (VR) studios at Charles Library’s Duckworth Scholars Studio and Ginsburg Health Science Library’s Innovation Space host two empathy-based VR (EbVR) experiences that individuals can use by appointment and faculty members can integrate into their classes. EbVR may deepen students’ understanding of a topic and enhance their ability to empathize with those they will encounter in their professional life. One set of recent reviewers writes, “there is no single recipe for empathy development,” (Bertrand et al. 2018). Still, our experience hosting EbVR course collaborations suggests that, when supported by a structured curriculum, this may be an exciting new mode for engaging students by harnessing empathy and emotions for learning. This poster discusses the pedagogical potential of EbVR, presents details of Nursing and Social Work course collaborations, and links to more information on EbVR at Temple Libraries.
    • Empower Yourself: AALL Publications, Programs, and Meetings

      Cosby, Michelle; 0000-0002-5087-094X (2020)
    • End PowerPoint dependency now!: Ease off the slides and improve your presentations at ALA or any other library conference

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2004-06)
      Bell offers several suggestions on how library professionals, who seem oblivious to the global backlash against PowerPoint, can reduce their dependency to the software, or at least make sure that the use of it enhances the presentations. He suggesrs that instead of serving up the usual series of bullet slides, librarians should try to integrate more "Web evidence," or "webidence" for short, and remember that with fewer bullet points to cover, one will have more opportunities to talk.
    • Exploring the Faculty Blogoverse: Where to Start and What’s in it for Academic Librarians

      Murray, David; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2007-10)
      A successful strategic keeping-up regimen requires more than a steady diet of content from within one's own profession. Murray and Bell identify resources for locating faculty blogs, identify some well-regarded faculty blogs worthy of review, and discuss how faculty blogs can benefit academic librarians and why they should be reading them as part of their regular keeping routine.
    • Fit Libraries are Future Proof

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-10)
      Fitness is a condition that allows someone to persist, avoid serious health problems, and live longer. If fitness is lacking, decline and decay may ensue. In the case of libraries, fitness translates to increased longevity and less chances of failure that lead to irrelevance. In contrast to fitness in individuals, fitness in libraries is an ambiguous concept. One may point to the numbers, such as an increase in circulation or the delivery of more instruction sessions, as signs of a fit library. However, fitness is achieved by means of a combination of strategies involving discipline, commitment to change, consistent behaviors, and having fun. This article looks at several strategies that libraries can adopt to make themselves fitter and future-proofed. Adapted from the source document.
    • From Gatekeepers to Gate Openers: Designing Meaningful Library Experiences

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2009-08)
      As gatekeepers and content buyers, academic librarians carve out only a limited higher education role - making information accessible - for themselves. Our future depends on our ability to differentiate what libraries offer and what library workers bring to their communities. This article lays out an alternate vision for the library profession - as gate-keeper - where the focus is on designing great library experiences and building relationships with community members.
    • Gen Con Programs

      Scales, Gary; Jewell, Kaelin; Sarkar, Ritomaitree; Huang, Luling; Shoemaker, Matt (2020)
      This dataset contains spreadsheets detailing all events held at the Gen Con gaming convention from 1968 to 2017.