• Blended Librarianship: [Re]Envisioning the Role of Librarians as Educator in the Digital Information Age

      Shank, John D.; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2011-12-05)
      Blended librarianship is intentionally not library centric (i.e., focused on the building and its physical collections) but, rather, it is librarian centric (i.e., focused on people's skill, knowledge they have to offer, and relationships they build).\n0 tools and emerging communication technologies can be directly present in both environments to provide course related instruction, deliver library resources and tutorials, as well as answer reference questions. [...] by integrating fundamental instructional design skills and knowledge, blended librarians become partners with faculty and other academic professionals in designing courses and incorporating information literacy and research skills into academic programs to achieve student learning outcomes.
    • Digital scholarship as a learning center in the library: Building relationships and educational initiatives

      Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-03)
      Hensley and Bell discuss digital scholarship as a learning center in the library. The technology in digital scholarship centers such as Arduino kits, laser cutters, virtual reality headsets, high-end scanners, visualization and video walls, and specialized software, provide an opportunity to build on the expertise of librarians, who are knowledgeable and passionate about sharing technology's connection to research but also willing to learn along with faculty and students as they explore possibilities presented by new models of digital scholarship. Since centers cannot wholly take on the responsibility of digital scholarship education, they must be willing to construct a network of collaborators across campus who have similar interests in leveraging new technologies and research methods to advance scholarship and learning at their institutions.
    • Exploring the Faculty Blogoverse: Where to Start and What’s in it for Academic Librarians

      Murray, David; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2007-10)
      A successful strategic keeping-up regimen requires more than a steady diet of content from within one's own profession. Murray and Bell identify resources for locating faculty blogs, identify some well-regarded faculty blogs worthy of review, and discuss how faculty blogs can benefit academic librarians and why they should be reading them as part of their regular keeping routine.
    • It’s Up to the Librarians: Establishing A Statewide OER Initiative

      Bell, Steven; Salem, Joseph A., Jr.; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-10-31)
      Academic librarians increasingly adopt roles as campus leaders to promote the adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) and other strategies to encourage making textbook affordability for students an institutional priority. When it comes to a statewide strategy to support academic library efforts for textbook affordability, Pennsylvania is lagging more progressive states such as Oregon, Georgia, Ohio, Virginia and Louisiana. This article makes a case for and lays out a strategy by which Pennsylvania’s academic librarians can develop a statewide initiative to tackle the challenge of textbook affordability together in order to achieve substantial progress.
    • Learning from Crucible Moments: Lessons in Crisis Leadership

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2019-02)
      Access to formal and informal leadership education and mentoring all contribute to the development of library leaders. Though crisis leadership may be discussed in leadership training, it is often the case that experiencing and leading through crises is the primary way in which most library leaders gain skill in managing these challenging situations. If we learn through our mistakes, then crisis leadership is surely a shining example of this principle for leaders are most apt to falter when finding themselves in the crucible. This article presents the crisis situation in which leaders are subjected to the changes forged in the crucible, as an opportunity for leaders to learn, gain wisdom and grow professionally, even when their performance may falter. It also presents the dark times crisis as a newer type of situation leaders will increasingly confront and for which they will find it difficult to adequately prepare. Different crisis scenarios are presented along with recommendations for how leaders can best manage and learn from them.
    • Submit or Resist: Librarianship in the Age of Google

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2005-10)
    • We're Listening: Try a Textbook Listening Tour to Advance an OER Initiative

      Bell, Steven; Johnson, Ann; 0000-0003-3916-4013; 0000-0003-4021-2473 (2019-06)
      It’s little surprise that academic librarians at institutions of every size and type are launching initiatives to encourage instructors to adopt Open Education Resources (OER). Whether these programs offer incentives to faculty or simply promote the benefits of OER and other textbook affordability options, they are a win for students who save money and gain a better learning experience. The textbook affordability movement in higher education also places academic librarians in a new leadership role as they manage campus-wide efforts to promote the benefits of OER. ACRL’s “2018 Top Trends in Academic Libraries” report identifies multiple challenges to faculty adoption, such as the lack of OER resources or perceived quality, but that these are also “opportunities for librarians to cultivate partnerships with faculty in the discovery, advocacy and preservation of OER.”