• A Pragmatic and Flexible Approach to Information Literacy: Findings from a Three-Year Study of Faculty-Librarian Collaboration

      Junisbai, Barbara; Lowe, M. Sara; Tagge , Natalie; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2016-07-15)
      While faculty often express dismay at their students' ability to locate and evaluate secondary sources, they may also be ambivalent about how to (and who should) teach the skills required to carry out quality undergraduate research. This project sought to assess the impact of programmatic changes and librarian course integration on students' information literacy (IL) skills. Using an IL rubric to score student papers (n = 337) over three consecutive first-year student cohorts, our study shows that when faculty collaborate with librarians to foster IL competencies, the result is a statistically significant improvement in students' demonstrated research skills. Our study also reveals a collaboration “sweet spot”: the greatest gains accrue when librarians provide moderate input into syllabus and assignment design, followed by one or two strategically placed hands-on library sessions. Successful collaboration thus need not entail completely overhauling content courses so as to make library instruction the centerpiece. Quite the opposite, librarians can help reduce the potential burden on faculty by supporting discipline- and course-specific research goals, as well as by sharing resources and best practices in IL pedagogy.
    • Learning from Crucible Moments: Lessons in Crisis Leadership

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2019-02)
      Access to formal and informal leadership education and mentoring all contribute to the development of library leaders. Though crisis leadership may be discussed in leadership training, it is often the case that experiencing and leading through crises is the primary way in which most library leaders gain skill in managing these challenging situations. If we learn through our mistakes, then crisis leadership is surely a shining example of this principle for leaders are most apt to falter when finding themselves in the crucible. This article presents the crisis situation in which leaders are subjected to the changes forged in the crucible, as an opportunity for leaders to learn, gain wisdom and grow professionally, even when their performance may falter. It also presents the dark times crisis as a newer type of situation leaders will increasingly confront and for which they will find it difficult to adequately prepare. Different crisis scenarios are presented along with recommendations for how leaders can best manage and learn from them.
    • Leveraging accreditation to integrate sustainable information literacy instruction into the medical school curriculum

      Tagge , Natalie; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2018-07-02)
      Background: While the term “information literacy” is not often used, the skills associated with that concept are now central to the mission and accreditation process of medical schools. The simultaneous emphasis on critical thinking skills, knowledge acquisition, active learning, and development and acceptance of technology perfectly positions libraries to be central to and integrated into the curriculum. Case Presentation: This case study discusses how one medical school and health sciences library leveraged accreditation to develop a sustainable and efficient flipped classroom model for teaching information literacy skills to first-year medical students. The model provides first-year medical students with the opportunity to learn information literacy skills, critical thinking skills, and teamwork, and then practice these skills throughout the pre-clerkship years. Conclusions: The curriculum was deemed a success and will be included in next year’s first-year curriculum. Faculty have reported substantial improvements in the information sources that first-year medical students are using in subsequent clinical reasoning conferences and in other parts of the curriculum. The effectiveness of the curriculum model was assessed using a rubric.
    • Student trauma experiences, library instruction and existence under the 45th

      Gohr, Michelle; Nova, Vitalina A. (2020-01-08)
      Purpose: By historicizing the broader system of education contextualized under the 45th presidential administration, this paper aims to provide a nuanced discussion regarding the condition of information literacy and librarianship as capitalist institutions in service to the state. In response, tools to oppose systemic racism and minimize harm in the classroom as well as recommendations for change and resistance are addressed. Design/methodology/approach: The paper focuses on historical analysis of libraries as institutions within larger educational systems and draws heavily on critical theories as a method of critique. Findings: This paper demonstrates that the 45th presidential administration is a logical progression of neoliberalism and institutionalized discrimination, which has had adverse effects on the health and safety of (primarily marginalized) students, library workers and library practice, but that critical reflection and information seeking on part of librarians may provide solutions. Practical implications: This paper can be used as a guide for librarians seeking to contextualize the educational environment and apply a critical praxis to information literacy programs. Social implications: The reflection presented in this paper can aid in expanding awareness in LIS surrounding issues of equity and justice, and impart urgency and need for institutional change. Originality/value: Given the lack of diversity in library and information science, this paper provides critical interventions for information literacy practice. The authors’ unique practical and theoretical backgrounds allow for nuanced discussion and pedagogical creation which directly impacts and addresses key issues of justice and equity in the classroom.