• A New Strategy for Enhancing Library Use: Faculty-Led Information Literacy Instruction

      Miller, William; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2005-05)
    • A Passion for Academic Librarianship: Find It, Keep It, Sustain It-A Reflective Inquiry

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2003-10)
      Why do academic librarians do what they do? This article explores the sources of passion that make academic librarianship a rewarding profession. A framework is introduced that examines the relationships within and outside the academy that contribute to the academic librarian's professional passion. The challenge of sustaining professional passion is addressed.
    • ACRL’s Hall of Fame: An Analysis of the Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award

      Krasulski, Michael J., Jr.; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2010-07)
      The Association of College & Research Libraries’ (ACRL) Academic/Research Librarian of the Year awardees constitute a “hall of fame” for ACRL. This article reports research analyzing 30 years of awardees between 1978 and 2007. Studying the demographics and accomplishments of the awardees contributes to knowledge of how academic librarianship has evolved as a profession and how its values have shifted. As the profession begins to explore and better comprehend the outcomes of its award processes, it may choose to evaluate and redesign them. This study offers several recommendations for change to the Academic/Research Librarian of the Year Award.
    • Barriers to Supporting Accessible VR in Academic Libraries

      Clark, Jasmine; Lischer-Katz, Zack (2020-05-20)
      Virtual reality (VR) shows great promise for enhancing the learning experience of students in higher education and academic libraries are at the forefront of efforts to bring VR into the curriculum as an innovative learning tool. This paper reviews some of the growing applications and benefits of VR technologies for supporting pedagogy in academic libraries and outlines the challenges of making VR accessible for disabled students. It defines existing regulations and guidelines for designing accessible digital technologies and offers two case studies drawn from each of the authors’ own academic libraries, at Temple University and at the University of Oklahoma, in order to provide insight into the challenges and benefits of making VR more accessible for students. The paper argues that to continue to serve their mission of equitable access to information for the entire student population, academic libraries that implement VR programs need to balance innovation with inclusion by allocating sufficient staff time and technical resources and bringing accessibility thinking into VR projects from the beginning. To accomplish this, libraries will need the assistance of software developers and accessibility experts, and librarians will need to act as strong advocates for better support from commercial software and hardware vendors and to promote change in their institutions.
    • Blended Librarianship: [Re]Envisioning the Role of Librarians as Educator in the Digital Information Age

      Shank, John D.; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2011-12-05)
      Blended librarianship is intentionally not library centric (i.e., focused on the building and its physical collections) but, rather, it is librarian centric (i.e., focused on people's skill, knowledge they have to offer, and relationships they build).\n0 tools and emerging communication technologies can be directly present in both environments to provide course related instruction, deliver library resources and tutorials, as well as answer reference questions. [...] by integrating fundamental instructional design skills and knowledge, blended librarians become partners with faculty and other academic professionals in designing courses and incorporating information literacy and research skills into academic programs to achieve student learning outcomes.
    • Building and Maintaining Metadata Aggregation Workflows Using Apache Airflow

      PA Digital (2021-09-22)
      PA Digital is a Pennsylvania network that serves as the state’s service hub for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The group developed a homegrown aggregation system in 2014, used to harvest digital collection records from contributing institutions, validate and transform their metadata, and deliver aggregated records to the DPLA. Since our initial launch, PA Digital has expanded significantly, harvesting from an increasing number of contributors with a variety of repository systems. With each new system, our highly customized aggregator software became more complex and difficult to maintain. By 2018, PA Digital staff had determined that a new solution was needed. From 2019 to 2021, a cross-functional team implemented a more flexible and scalable approach to metadata aggregation for PA Digital, using Apache Airflow for workflow management and Solr/Blacklight for internal metadata review. In this article, we will outline how we use this group of applications and the new workflows adopted, which afford our metadata specialists more autonomy to contribute directly to the ongoing development of the aggregator. We will discuss how this work fits into our broader sustainability planning as a network and how the team leveraged shared expertise to build a more stable approach to maintenance.
    • Building Better Academic Libraries with Web 2.0 Tools

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2007-11)
    • Collections Are For Collisions: Designing It Into the Experience

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2014-09)
      Who among us has never known, however trivial, a serendipitous discovery. More essentially, nearly every librarian has heard at some point in his or her career someone's story about a serendipitous encounter with a book. As a profession we are likely in agreement that serendipitous discovery in the library stacks is a good thing. Think of it as collision with our collections. As our collections become more digital and less tangible, as we move them off the stacks and into onsite or remote storage, and as students spend more time touching keyboards and less time connecting with texts, how likely is it that future patrons will have such experiences. What's odd about the impending decline of this type of engagement is that in other industrial sectors, the very act of serendipity is being engineered into the workflow. Librarians, on the other hand, appear to be excising serendipity out of the library experience. If we believe there is value in the act of serendipity, then it is our responsibility to design the library experience to save it. Adapted from the source document.
    • Coming in the Back Door: Leveraging Open Textbooks to Promote Scholarly Communications on Campus

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2012-05-15)
      Textbook affordability is a critical issue in higher education. Academic librarians have responded by creating programs to encourage faculty to become aware of the cost of textbooks and using open educational resources as an alternative. Another, less obvious reason to start a campus textbook affordability initiative is to establish a culture of openness for all types of open material. Faculty are often much more willing to confront textbook costs than they are costly, pay-walled journals. The author describes how he instituted a project to create more awareness of open content on his campus.
    • Constructive destruction: Examining the life cycle of texts through RE:BOOK

      Tagge , Natalie; Booth, Char; 0000-0001-6200-8217 (2013-09)
    • Cornucopia of Library Technology: What to Choose and Use

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2005-11)
    • Design Thinking

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2008-01)
      Design thinking can offer a new way of thinking about, acting on, and implementing our resources and services with a more thoughtful and creative approach that is focused on the design of the best possible library user experience. @ your library My first encounter with the application of design thinking in a library setting was the Maya Design firm's renovation and remodeling of the main branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. [...] librarians can still make use of design thinking in reengineering how users navigate the library and its electronic resources.\n Books and articles by and about design thinkers, such as the The Art of Innovation, can provide greater detail and more concrete examples of how design thinking is applied to the creation of products and services. The Blended Librarians Online Learning Community at blendedlibrarian .org is a free community open to all that is justbeginningto explore ways in which design thinking can be applied to further collab oration with community partners and help students achieve academic success.
    • Design Thinking + User Experience = Better-Designed Libraries

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2018-07)
      This article provides an overview of design thinking as a component of, and contributor to, great library user experiences. When design thinking is used to shape the environment in which users connect with library spaces and personnel, the result is a better library experience—by design.
    • Digital scholarship as a learning center in the library: Building relationships and educational initiatives

      Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2017-03)
      Hensley and Bell discuss digital scholarship as a learning center in the library. The technology in digital scholarship centers such as Arduino kits, laser cutters, virtual reality headsets, high-end scanners, visualization and video walls, and specialized software, provide an opportunity to build on the expertise of librarians, who are knowledgeable and passionate about sharing technology's connection to research but also willing to learn along with faculty and students as they explore possibilities presented by new models of digital scholarship. Since centers cannot wholly take on the responsibility of digital scholarship education, they must be willing to construct a network of collaborators across campus who have similar interests in leveraging new technologies and research methods to advance scholarship and learning at their institutions.
    • End PowerPoint dependency now!: Ease off the slides and improve your presentations at ALA or any other library conference

      Bell, Steven; 0000-0003-3916-4013 (2004-06)
      Bell offers several suggestions on how library professionals, who seem oblivious to the global backlash against PowerPoint, can reduce their dependency to the software, or at least make sure that the use of it enhances the presentations. He suggesrs that instead of serving up the usual series of bullet slides, librarians should try to integrate more "Web evidence," or "webidence" for short, and remember that with fewer bullet points to cover, one will have more opportunities to talk.