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dc.contributor.advisorStull, Judith C., 1944-
dc.creatorHenderson, Latosha Rena
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T15:20:01Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T15:20:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2995
dc.description.abstractThe scope of this research deals with the notion that military service yields higher levels of earnings for individuals who successfully transition into the civilian labor force. Through the Human Capital Theory (HCT) lens, this study assessed the relationship between military connection and civilian labor force economic outcomes for women. The results of this study inform policy makers, military recruiters, civilian employers, and college administrators, with insights into how to support military connected women’s transition into the civilian workforce. This study hypothesized that military service along with the attainment of at least a bachelor’s degree would serve as a bridge to higher pay for women after transitioning into the civilian labor force. Drawing on data from the 2017 National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG), the focus of this quantitative study was to investigate how a college education affects civilian earnings. This study compared labor market outcomes between military connected women and non- military connected individuals who have earned at least a bachelor’s degree to determine if military service yields an earnings premium. This analysis determined that in general military connected women do not experience an earnings premium over military connected men and non- military connected individuals when combining military service and education after transitioning into the civilian labor force. Furthermore, this study revealed military does not act as a bridge to higher civilian labor force earnings for women. This suggests that a bridging environment from military service does not exist for women. Overall this study found that an individual’s military connection does not hinder their ability to successfully transition into the civilian labor force. However, it does suggest that military service does not act as a mechanism to move military connected job candidates to the front of the line.
dc.format.extent131 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMilitary Studies
dc.subjectEducational Leadership
dc.subjectWomen's Studies
dc.subjectCivilian Labor Force
dc.subjectMilitary
dc.subjectRegression Analysis
dc.subjectSalary
dc.subjectVeterans
dc.subjectWomen
dc.titleIS MILITARY SERVICE GOOD FOR AN EDUCATED WOMAN?
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Jennifer M., 1970-
dc.contributor.committeememberLaurence, Janice H.
dc.description.departmentEducational Leadership
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2977
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T15:20:01Z


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