Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCaldwell, Corrinne A.
dc.creatorHartman, Lianne
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T15:19:59Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T15:19:59Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.other890207689
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2981
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative case study utilized interviews with community college students enrolled in at least one developmental course to describe how students accessed college information and used this information to solidify or adjust their educational aspirations. College information sources included relatives, friends, classmates, professors, advisors, and other college personnel. Bourdieu's cultural capital and Tinto's integration frameworks were used as guiding theories. This study utilized semi-structured interviews with 15 first-time, full-time, remedial students at a suburban community college in the northeastern United States. Interviews conducted in the fall and spring semesters explored students' perceptions of college information sources in order to gain insight into how students viewed information and its implications over time. This study identified four categories that broadly characterize students' information seeking and application behavior: students were classified as dreamers, drifters, passengers, or planners. Students classified as dreamers had difficulty aligning their career and educational goals. While college information was an issue for dreamers, they required more intensive guidance about their larger educational picture before information about intermediary steps would be meaningful for them. Drifters had informed educational goals, but possessed incomplete information or had difficulty applying strategies to reach these goals. Passengers and planners were well-informed and had specific strategies to accomplish their educational aspirations. Planners actively sought out information. Passengers benefited from a guide, such as a dedicated advisor or mentor, who helped them to interpret and apply the information. This study suggests that just presenting students with information is insufficient; to get students on surer footing, colleges should explore both decreasing the need for information in the first place and providing students assistance with applying information to their unique situations.
dc.format.extent160 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectEducation, Community College
dc.subjectEducation, Higher
dc.subjectInformation Science
dc.subjectCollege Information
dc.subjectCommunity Colleges
dc.subjectCultural Capital
dc.subjectInformation Behavior
dc.titleCommunity College Students' Awareness and Use of College Information
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberHorvat, Erin McNamara
dc.contributor.committeememberGoyette, Kimberly A.
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, James Earl
dc.contributor.committeememberPartlow, Michelle Chaplin
dc.description.departmentEducational Administration
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2963
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T15:19:59Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXHartman-temple-0225E-11 ...
Size:
2.612Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record