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dc.contributor.advisorPendergast, Laura L.
dc.creatorWilliams, Brittney
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-25T19:56:08Z
dc.date.available2020-08-25T19:56:08Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/291
dc.description.abstractSchool climate is a construct frequently explored in educational research (Lee, Cornell, Gregory, & Fan, 2011; Wang & Degol, 2016) and is associated positive several outcomes including with improved student-teacher relationships (Croninger & Lee, 2001) and reduced school dropout risk (Jia, Konold, & Cornell, 2016). Unfortunately, emerging research indicates that racial differences in schools’ penal practices may be negatively coupled with Black students’ experience of a supportive school climate (Bottiani, Bradshaw, & Mendelson, 2017). Black students are disproportionately subjected to exclusionary disciplinary practices (e.g., suspensions and expulsions) in the learning environment (Fenning & Rose, 2007) and Black girls disproportionally encounter more adverse disciplinary outcomes in their educational setting (National Black Women’s Justice Institute, 2018) relative to their White peers (Blake, Butler, Lewis, & Darensbourg, 2011; Crenshaw, Ocen, & Nanda, 2015; Epstein, Blake, & González, 2017; Hines-Datiri & Carter Andrews, 2017). Persistent use of punitive practices may hinder Black girls’ racial identity, academic, and social-emotional development in the classroom (Chavous, Rivas-Drake, Smalls, Griffin, & Cogburn, 2008; Leath, Mathews, Harrison, & Chavous, 2019) and consequently detrimentally impact their school climate. Researchers have called for evidence-based and culturally relevant interventions that promote positive academic outcomes for Black girls (Jones et al., 2018). However, evidence-based interventions are dependent on the use of empirically supported assessments with diverse student groups (Pendergast et al., 2017). Evidence-based assessments are necessary to identify students’ needs in the educational setting and provide baseline data that allow for the evaluation of intervention effectiveness. Moreover, school climate assessments for Black girls may facilitate the development of evidence-based interventions for Black girls - who are disproportionally disciplined and may be at risk of experiencing a negative school climate. This study investigated the structural validity and reliability of scores from a school climate measurement tool. The study examined measurement invariance of the Student Connection Survey, with a specific focus on Black girls’ scores. Results indicated the Student Connection Survey is represented by five-latent factors and is equivalent between Black and White middle school girls. Implications, strengths, limitations, and future research directions are discussed.
dc.format.extent92 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectSocial Sciences Education
dc.subjectBlack Girls
dc.subjectDisproportionality
dc.subjectEvidence-based Interventions
dc.subjectInvariance
dc.subjectMeasurement
dc.subjectSchool Climate
dc.titleMEASUREMENT EQUIVALENCE OF THE PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL CLIMATE SURVEY ACROSS RACE AND GENDER: A FOCUS ON BLACK GIRLS
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberFergus, Edward, 1974-
dc.contributor.committeememberSandilos, Lia
dc.contributor.committeememberDuCette, Joseph P.
dc.description.departmentSchool Psychology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/275
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14159
dc.creator.orcid0000-0003-1265-7547
dc.date.updated2020-08-18T19:04:55Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-25T19:56:08Z
dc.identifier.filenameWilliams_temple_0225E_14159.pdf


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