Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFolio, Cynthia
dc.creatorGatti, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-04T15:19:45Z
dc.date.available2020-11-04T15:19:45Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/2901
dc.description.abstractIn The Who’s second rock opera Quadrophenia, a fictitious teenager suffers from a mental illness that gives him four distinct personalities. Its main songwriter, Pete Townshend, uses the disorder and the four personalities as a means to represent the four members of The Who through the teenage protagonist, a young mod named Jimmy. Townshend reveals Jimmy’s disposition at the conclusion of a lament written from Jimmy’s perspective in Quadrophenia’s liner notes, in a harrowing confession: “Schizophrenic? I’m bleeding quadrophenic.” In this monograph, I will examine Quadrophenia for its representations of mental illness through textual, musical, and historical perspectives and how these perspectives provide evidence toward a storyline based around the cultural concept of madness. Mental illness is an invisible illness, for the inflicted does not present noticeable symptoms to others, making it difficult to perceive and accurately diagnose. That is why within popular culture, schizophrenia is oftentimes used interchangeably with multiple personality disorder (now known as dissociative identity disorder), as is the case with Jimmy in Quadrophenia. Although these disorders are not at all similar, both are considered under the broader umbrella of madness, a term which historically was of medical and legal significance but gained political and ideological meanings in our modern society. Quadrophenia was meant as a tribute and celebration of The Who’s beginnings within the mid-60s London mod subculture. The invisible illness aspect of the storyline is worth investigating for its avoidance of treating mental illness within the medical model, in which it is considered to be a deficit of normalcy that is in need of a fix or cure. Though Jimmy struggles with his illness, it is mostly viewed as part of his adolescent character and then further used as a way of musically and textually representing The Who and the musicians’ individual characters. The Who were the epitome of music and madness; their music often spoke in terms of deviance and disobedience, while their live performances were physical and objectionably loud, sometimes concluding with the destruction of instruments. Treating mental illness, as well as physical and developmental impairments, as difference rather than deficit, is a key principle of current disability studies and its cultural model of disability. This is in opposition to the biological model in the medical field. Society has constructed madness as a binary to sanity, and thus a contrast to normalcy. As this binary is still in practice today, society as a whole continues to stigmatize mental illness and forces it to remain invisible. The Who and their embodiment of mental illness in Quadrophenia are meant not merely to arouse sympathy for Jimmy, but also to empower mental illness as a basis of character strength. The following monograph begins with an introduction to music and disability studies regarding mental illness. The next chapter offers a glimpse into the literature on The Who and Quadrophenia, including a survey of a 2013 conference dedicated exclusively to Quadrophenia. Finally, a chapter analyzes representations of mental illness in Quadrophenia within the music, society, and The Who themselves before a brief concluding chapter.
dc.format.extent84 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectDisability Studies
dc.subjectMusic History
dc.titleInside/Outside: Representations of Invisible Illness in The Who's Quadrophenia
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldin-Perschbacher, Shana
dc.contributor.committeememberBrunner, Matthew
dc.contributor.committeememberWillier, Stephen Ace
dc.description.departmentMusic Performance
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/2883
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreeD.M.A.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-04T15:19:45Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
TETDEDXGatti-temple-0225E-13220.pdf
Size:
960.1Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record