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dc.contributor.advisorAsante, Molefi Kete, 1942-
dc.creatorPaige, Garrison Danielle
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-25T19:54:28Z
dc.date.available2020-08-25T19:54:28Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/280
dc.description.abstractMichael Tillotson’s Agency Reduction Formation theory is designed to expose, situate, and explain ideological trends that are intended to compel African people to distance themselves from their collective identity (Tillotson 2011, 62). Identity provides African people the internal construction to seek self-determination that allows them to strive for agency, the ability to provide the psychological and cultural resources necessary for the advancement of human freedom (Asante 2007, 40-41). In this study, I have added an agential location dimension to the discourse of “identity names” utilizing Afrocentric analysis to interrogate whether those specific “identity names” position African people toward victorious consciousness, an attitude which reflects a commitment to Africana history, values, and culture. In addition to exploring why it is problematic for African people to identify with terms such as “Nigga”, “Bad Bitch”, “Savage” and “Trap Queen” given the controversy sustained by their overuse as racial epithets and radical forms of misnaming, I also address how such “identity words” are aggressive forms of Agency Reduction Formation. To demonstrate how the use of the previously mentioned “identity words” is an agency reducing activity, I analyzed the words and photographs of African men and women featured on the social networking platform Instagram. Through content analysis, I claimed that African people identifying particularly as a “Nigga”, “Bad Bitch”, “Savage” and “Trap Queen” within their profiles and posts create an environment for dis-empowerment, identity dislocation, and internalized oppression. If tendencies to use these “agency reducing identity words” continues in this manner, African people will experience ongoing cultural dislocation that diminishes their “need for a collective agency that fights against oppression.”
dc.format.extent791 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectAfrican American Studies
dc.subjectBlack Studies
dc.subjectRhetoric
dc.subjectAfrican American Rhetoric
dc.subjectAfrican Rhetoric
dc.subjectAfrocentricity
dc.subjectAgency
dc.subjectAgency Reduction Formation
dc.subjectNommo
dc.titleWE ARE WHAT WE SPEAK: AN AFROCENTRIC ANALYSIS OF THE MANIFESTATION AND IMPACT OF AGENCY REDUCING IDENTITIES FOUND ON INSTAGRAM
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Amari
dc.contributor.committeememberAllison, Donnetrice
dc.contributor.committeememberMazama, Ama, 1961-
dc.description.departmentAfrican American Studies
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/264
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst14146
dc.date.updated2020-08-18T19:04:22Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-25T19:54:29Z
dc.identifier.filenamePaige_temple_0225E_14146.pdf


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