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dc.contributor.advisorStankiewicz, Damien, 1980-
dc.creatorJessee, Nathan
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-25T19:52:09Z
dc.date.available2020-08-25T19:52:09Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12613/268
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines social, political, and cultural dimensions of displacement, resettlement planning, and climate change adaptation policy experimentation along Louisiana’s Gulf Coast. I draw upon four years of ethnographic research alongside Isle de Jean Charles Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribal leaders, during a period just before and after their resettlement plans garnered $48 million in federal financial support. Through participant observation and interviews with Tribal leaders, their allies, media-makers who covered the Tribe’s experiences, and state planners tasked with administering the federal funds, I examined social encounters produced as the Tribe’s resettlement plans were embraced, circulated, and transformed throughout international media and policy. My analysis points to a number of tensions expressed as Tribal community-driven efforts to address historically produced vulnerabilities collided with government efforts to reduce exposure to coastal environmental hazards. I describe how policies, planning practices, and particular constructions of disaster and community encumbered Tribal leaders’ long-standing struggle for recognition, self-determination and sovereignty, land, and cultural survival. Ultimately, I argue that the state’s allocation of federal resettlement funds has reproduced a colonial frontier dynamic whereby redevelopment is rested upon the erasure of Indigenous histories; identities; and ongoing struggles for self- determination, land, and cultural survival. Using ethnography to interrogate the social encounters produced through adaptation may inform policies, planning processes, and activism in solidarity with those already regenerating social and ecological relationships threatened by racial capitalism, settler colonialism, and climate change.
dc.format.extent270 pages
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherTemple University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartofTheses and Dissertations
dc.rightsIN COPYRIGHT- This Rights Statement can be used for an Item that is in copyright. Using this statement implies that the organization making this Item available has determined that the Item is in copyright and either is the rights-holder, has obtained permission from the rights-holder(s) to make their Work(s) available, or makes the Item available under an exception or limitation to copyright (including Fair Use) that entitles it to make the Item available.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectClimate Change
dc.subjectCultural Anthropology
dc.subjectUrban Planning
dc.subjectClimate Change
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectLouisiana
dc.subjectManaged Retreat
dc.subjectResettlement
dc.subjectSettler Colonialism
dc.titleRESHAPING LOUISIANA’S COASTAL FRONTIER: TRIBAL COMMUNITY RESETTLEMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
dc.typeText
dc.type.genreThesis/Dissertation
dc.contributor.committeememberLevi, Heather, 1962-
dc.contributor.committeememberOsman, Wazhmah, 1974-
dc.contributor.committeememberMaldonado, Julie Koppel
dc.description.departmentAnthropology
dc.relation.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34944/dspace/252
dc.ada.noteFor Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodation, including help with reading this content, please contact scholarshare@temple.edu
dc.description.degreePh.D.
dc.identifier.proqst13988
dc.date.updated2020-08-18T19:03:53Z
dc.embargo.lift08/18/2022
dc.identifier.filenameJessee_temple_0225E_13988.pdf


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